oh yes, I definitely understand that. And sometimes also, I have to be skeptical of my own skepticism about my own brain and just believe what I thought first. The skeptic can easily become the dominant voice lulling into a false sense of safety when in fact it becomes the liar.

oh yes, I definitely understand that. And sometimes also, I have to be skeptical of my own skepticism about my own brain and just believe what I thought first. The skeptic can easily become the dominant voice lulling into a false sense of safety when in fact it becomes the liar.
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  • It’s a phenomenon you see on Youtube comments on videos:
    8-10 year olds, freshly possessing a new found skepticism about what’s presented to them on media, will comment in droves on “amazing videos”:
    “fake”
    “fake af”
    “dumb”
    “not real”
    whether it is or not. I think it’s excellent to doubt what you see – I remember going through it at my own TV set at that age – yet that can also take over to where one seeks other skeptics to confirm one’s own skepticism… and if it’s done without proper rigor, well, I’m just yapping.
      It really is amazing – and what’s weird for me in the experience of holding what ‘feels’ like contradictory notions simultaneously – is this constant pull to “choose a door”
    ==

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