Oh this I have to think about – oof: But, I think in this ontology, I don’t see why Spontaneous Mode and Flow mode can’t operate in parallel: “Incidentally, this is also why flow flows. This feeling of perpetual continuity is generated by three mechanisms. First, flow is a no-search, mapping process in which each step is automated and paired with a controller. Second, flow is a stepwise process since the implicit system cannot anticipate more than one step at the time. Without prediction, each step of the chain depends on the preceding one and triggers the next. This also makes it impossible for the FM to scaffold. Third, flow is free of meta-analytical, explicit interference that could disrupt the performance. Given that the activity itself must occur in a known problem space, the question arises where in the FM is the creativity. In creating a painting, for instance, an artist’s actual hand movements are nothing new to the motor system, and each stroke of the brush is mapped. Likewise, a jazz musician’s technique must be skillful for improvisation to yield anything creative. Although there are differences between these two flow examples, as the former still allows for revisions while the latter does not, the creative act cannot lay in the steps themselves but must emerge from the overall pattern produced by the entire action-perception sequence (Dietrich, 2015). In other words, a series of individual, uncreative steps can produce a final, creative configuration. This is different from the DM and SM in which a single step can be a creative act (Table 1).”

Oh this I have to think about – oof:

But, I think in this ontology, I don’t see why Spontaneous Mode and Flow mode can’t operate in parallel:

“Incidentally, this is also why flow flows. This feeling of perpetual continuity is generated by three mechanisms. First, flow is a no-search, mapping process in which each step is automated and paired with a controller. Second, flow is a stepwise process since the implicit system cannot anticipate more than one step at the time. Without prediction, each step of the chain depends on the preceding one and triggers the next. This also makes it impossible for the FM to scaffold. Third, flow is free of meta-analytical, explicit interference that could disrupt the performance.

Given that the activity itself must occur in a known problem space, the question arises where in the FM is the creativity. In creating a painting, for instance, an artist’s actual hand movements are nothing new to the motor system, and each stroke of the brush is mapped. Likewise, a jazz musician’s technique must be skillful for improvisation to yield anything creative. Although there are differences between these two flow examples, as the former still allows for revisions while the latter does not, the creative act cannot lay in the steps themselves but must emerge from the overall pattern produced by the entire action-perception sequence (Dietrich, 2015). In other words, a series of individual, uncreative steps can produce a final, creative configuration. This is different from the DM and SM in which a single step can be a creative act (Table 1).”

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