Oh now where was THIS PAGE a while back? I had to figure this out myself. Well, at least I found it now. Common components of ontologies include: Individuals instances or objects (the basic or “ground level” objects) Classes sets, collections, concepts, types of objects, or kinds of things.[1] Attributes aspects, properties, features, characteristics, or parameters that objects (and classes) can have [2] Relations ways in which classes and individuals can be related to one another[3] Function terms complex structures formed from certain relations that can be used in place of an individual term in a statement Restrictions formally stated descriptions of what must be true in order for some assertion to be accepted as input Rules statements in the form of an if-then (antecedent-consequent) sentence that describe the logical inferences that can be drawn from an assertion in a particular form Axioms assertions (including rules) in a logical form that together comprise the overall theory that the ontology describes in its domain of application.[4] This definition differs from that of “axioms” in generative grammar and formal logic. In these disciplines, axioms include only statements asserted as a priori knowledge. As used here, “axioms” also include the theory derived from axiomatic statements.[citation needed] Events the changing of attributes or relations https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontology_components

Oh now where was THIS PAGE a while back? I had to figure this out myself. Well, at least I found it now.
 
Common components of ontologies include:
 
Individuals
instances or objects (the basic or “ground level” objects)
Classes
sets, collections, concepts, types of objects, or kinds of things.[1]
Attributes
aspects, properties, features, characteristics, or parameters that objects (and classes) can have [2]
Relations
ways in which classes and individuals can be related to one another[3]
Function terms
complex structures formed from certain relations that can be used in place of an individual term in a statement
Restrictions
formally stated descriptions of what must be true in order for some assertion to be accepted as input
Rules
statements in the form of an if-then (antecedent-consequent) sentence that describe the logical inferences that can be drawn from an assertion in a particular form
Axioms
assertions (including rules) in a logical form that together comprise the overall theory that the ontology describes in its domain of application.[4] This definition differs from that of “axioms” in generative grammar and formal logic. In these disciplines, axioms include only statements asserted as a priori knowledge. As used here, “axioms” also include the theory derived from axiomatic statements.[citation needed]
Events
the changing of attributes or relations
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontology_components

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