oh! it is the Secondary somatosensory cortex! Comprehending Prehending: Neural Correlates of Processing Verbs with Motor Stems “Direct Contrasts A list of significant activations can be seen in Table 3 and in Figure 1. The whole-brain analysis of the interaction between Morph  Stem ([SM – SA] – [CM – CA]) showed reliably greater differences between the simple verb forms (motor stem > abstract stem) than between complex verb forms (motor verb stem > abstract verb stem) in several regions within the motor circuit. Specifically, an interaction was seen in the left dorsal postcentral gyrus, the left parietal operculum (secondary somatosensory cortex), and the left posterior medial temporal lobe” abstract: “The interaction between language and action systems has become an increasingly interesting topic of discussion in cognitive neuroscience. Several recent studies have shown that processing of action verbs elicits activation in the cerebral motor system in a somatotopic manner. The current study extends these findings to show that the brain responses for processing of verbs with specific motor meanings differ not only from that of other motor verbs, but, crucially, that the comprehension of verbs with motor meanings (i.e., greifen, to grasp) differs fundamentally from the processing of verbs with abstract meanings (i.e., denken, to think).”

oh! it is the Secondary somatosensory cortex!
 
Comprehending Prehending: Neural Correlates of Processing Verbs with Motor Stems
 
“Direct Contrasts
A list of significant activations can be seen in Table 3 and
in Figure 1.
The whole-brain analysis of the interaction between
Morph  Stem ([SM – SA] – [CM – CA]) showed reliably
greater differences between the simple verb forms (motor stem > abstract stem) than between complex verb
forms (motor verb stem > abstract verb stem) in several regions within the motor circuit.
 
Specifically, an interaction was seen in the left dorsal postcentral gyrus, the left parietal operculum (secondary somatosensory
cortex), and the left posterior medial temporal lobe”
 
abstract:
“The interaction between language and action systems has become an increasingly interesting topic of discussion in cognitive neuroscience. Several recent studies have shown that processing of action verbs elicits activation in the cerebral motor system in a somatotopic manner. The current study extends these findings to show that the brain responses for processing of verbs with specific motor meanings differ not only from that of other motor verbs, but, crucially, that the comprehension of verbs with motor meanings (i.e., greifen, to grasp) differs fundamentally from the processing of verbs with abstract meanings (i.e., denken, to think).”
 

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