Never saw a good reason. Urinals or stalls doesn’t matter to me. Do your business and go. Have stalls go to the floor for privacy. I suppose isolated areas maybe? But that’s dangerous anyway because regardless of label on door, a perv will await… I’ve known a lot of mothers with sons and fathers with daughters put into an unnecessary dilemma having to sex segregate from theirs kids around a certain age. That’s a much more common problem that unisex bathroom would solve than any problems that separated bathrooms prevent.

Never saw a good reason. Urinals or stalls doesn’t matter to me. Do your business and go. Have stalls go to the floor for privacy.

I suppose isolated areas maybe? But that’s dangerous anyway because regardless of label on door, a perv will await…

I’ve known a lot of mothers with sons and fathers with daughters put into an unnecessary dilemma having to sex segregate from theirs kids around a certain age. That’s a much more common problem that unisex bathroom would solve than any problems that separated bathrooms prevent.

So, boys and men will learn that girls and women fart and poop and make bad smells.

Girls and women will learn that boys and men ALSO don’t like making fart and poop noises when someone else is in the room.

Boys will learn that women’s periods have a smell they might not recognize because there would now be a sanitary napkin disposal.

That’s all I see.

Doom + Gloom gets old sometimes.

My 1st unisex big bathrooms was college, 1990/91. I assumed by 2000, all bathrooms would be unisex. Was wrong.

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Here’s how it was for us: First 3 days it was weird. [showers there too with stalls]. After that, it was like brothers and sisters.

There was a lipstick lesbians only floor below — smelled like pachulli and someone monitored I think, but i never went there. It was no big deal.

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It was (is) an uber liberal “hippie” college.- different planet tbh. There were also women’s only spaces as well, unrelated to sexuality. It just happened to be the first time I saw anything like that, along with getting dental dams and credit card applications in my mailbox.

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They still struggle with PoC discrimination and intersectionality issues and the growth of what-about-white-male-nationalist-rights started in the early 00s and spread, adding another wrinkle.

But generally, there was a spot to feel welcomed there somewhere..

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I can only go by my perspective and the women I know who have dealt with problems related to having to be separated from their kids because they were forced to because of sex segregation.

The woman’s bathroom serves additional needs that men’s do not.

Perhaps a woman’s safety center could be a feature in areas with unisex bathroom? How do they handle it in parts of the world that have adopted unisex bathrooms as standard?

If they serve a need, then of course i won’t argue for removal. I think it would be great if there were safe secure women’s only bathrooms available everywhere.

But these additional needs that aren’t official, shouldn’t they also be addressed rather than a bathroom be used for all of the additional needs?

Colleges usually have women’s safety centers, open 24 hrs and staffed. Every community should have many of these.

If a bathroom is the only safe space for a woman in a given location, then other things need to be addressed in a big way because that’s a lot of duties for one space to perform, if it goes beyond what the porcelin fixures are created for.

Clearly society must be royally fucked up if a bathroom is the only safety available. No wonder why you fight so hard for it.

M and he did not respect any signs on the walls. He ended up in psychiatric facility for a long time because he had a slick lawyer and got out by the time he was in his early 30s and has been harassing her ever since on and off, although not at the nearly deadly levels when she was young.

The space is only safe as long as people respect the sign on the wall.

So, my bias shows. I didn’t see women’s rooms protect my , so I did not automatically think they provided safety. But if that’s one of their purposes, then something deeper needs addressing too.

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There’s some really deep systemic issues going on then because there should be something more than that available in every town, city, village and community for women.

It’s good that most men respect the sign on the wall that says “Women” on it.

My  gave her a concussion and busted her nose, in a woman’s public bathroom after she ran there for safety, .. and found no safety there. She was 15.

Chased after her with a knife and she got cut up on top of it, although she put up a solid fight.

I was like 13 at the time. Shaped my worldview of signs.

So, my worldview on signs comes from witnessing the results of a sociopath (psychopath? I dunno) who knew no boundaries. A sign saying “Women’s” meant nothing to him.

I’m glad they work most of the time and I didn’t mean to sound insensitive. Clearly women need something far more than the protection of a sign and a cultural agreement because it’s not enough but at least it’s something.

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K. I’m convinced. Three bathrooms ’til the lack of better assistance for women in every town, village and city is addressed properly.

If a woman’s restroom is the only place to get a little peace from men and it’s available in every space in the USA, then taking that away would take away a space that in some places is the ONLY consistent women’s only space readily available.

I’d make three. Men, Women, Leave-me-alone. The leave-me-alone room would allow fathers and daughters, mothers and sons, trans, and anybody who just needs to do their business. I’d probably pick the leave-me-alone room if for no other reason to get away from the once every two years experience of, “Oh God somebody’s IN THERE? WTF is taking you so long in there? GOD”

Most of the time, though, nobody wants to be in the bathroom in the first place (men’s room), nobody talks, nobody looks at anybody else and men hold their farts in until the room is clear.

But I’d still pick the leave-me-alone room if it was available.

Yeah, I can see that now. It’s an accessible, widely available women’s only space.

I think another reason I didn’t “see it” is that I was custodian of the Methodist church I grew up by from age 13-18. It was a big church which had a large secular nursery school (with about 20 classrooms) that ran during the week, and many bathrooms, a few large.

So from age 13 up, I was in women’s and men’s restrooms daily to clean up whatever messes were there after school. I always knocked first and if it was empty, I’d go in and clean up, empty garbage, etc 7 days a week.

Then at college, I was exposed to unisex bathrooms from 18-19 yrs old and that was all 25 years ago.

It saddens me that women’s rights have barely progressed in the USA and that some things may be going backwards.

She learned at a young age the law enforcement and justice system is easily fooled by a smiling face sociopath – and hippie do-gooders like me who believe in rehabilitation and a world where people generally get along or can learn to are part of the problem continuing I suppose.

He almost killed her several times as teenagers and twice in her 20s. Restraining orders didn’t work as he knew enough to wait until his case was old before striking. Left her kitchen bloody once, chunks of her hair and stuff.

He pretended to be crazy and got into a mental hospital instead of prison for rehab. After 10 yrs or so, he convinced them “I’m cured”.

Within a year, he started up again, just spaced long enough apart so she’ll never be able to get past him, but not close enough for law enforcement to do anything.

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really believed we’d be more progressed by now. I keep hoping and working towards it but this thread was a good reminder that it’s a long road ahead for the USA at least.

I’d argue that sociopaths don’t respect signs anyway, so that is not an argument for unisex or for segregated bathrooms but a recognition that sometimes a sign on a wall doesn’t matter regardless.

I just realized that although it’s not full protection, that sign must confer SOME benefits in many situations.since most men DO respect the sign.

I don’t think it’s gone into the question of “what is a man and what isn’t a man” though, as that is a different territory.

Then clearly there needs to be more to protect women against predatory behavior if the restroom is their only recourse in many places.

 

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