My mom worked in my local Prosecutor’s Office (like DA’s office elsewhere). A few times a year, a detective or police officer would: a) shoot a hole through his desk while cleaning gun b) shoot foot c) there’d be a friendly fire incident. Shit happens.

My mom worked in my local Prosecutor’s Office (like DA’s office elsewhere).

A few times a year, a detective or police officer would:
a) shoot a hole through his desk while cleaning gun
b) shoot foot
c) there’d be a friendly fire incident.

Shit happens.

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See my link. I don’t know if he was level I II or III but it’s either 144 hrs of training, 333 hrs of training or 727 hrs of training that he had under his belt t qualify as reserve police.

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Shit happens man, you should know that. Maybe he just wore too many hats. Substitute mayor / city council, full time teacher *and* police reserve force. What role was he in that day?

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It’s just a damn stupid accident. Maybe training as a safety instructor is what he needed. Doing and teaching what you’re doing are different skills.

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I think you’re right. Military’s single focus, training breaks personal willpower towards a team mentality. Police training is more individualist, it might be only you there, trust your gut stuff.

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I trust military over police any day, because that personnel standing alone is always fully aware of his accountability towards his surroundings and after effects.

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A striking example for me: I was watching a BLM thing a couple of years ago, watching a guy walking and talking towards the center of town after mandatory curfew. There was no love for police there.

But then, he saw three National Guard standing on the side of the road.

His eyes lit up and he walked over to these guys and he couldn’t say enough nice things about them. He was genuinely afraid of what police would do but those guardsmen made him feel safe.

That said everything to me.

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tbh I’d prefer active duty national guardsman, maybe a special program. I’ve known a few vets with minor and major PTSD issues. Humans just aren’t designed for combat. But I’d still prefer vets over teachers juggling multiple jobs.

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Full time teacher, city council / substitute mayor, and police reserve, with sufficient training to carry firearms.
 
Maybe too many hats? What role was he in that day?
 
Probably should have had training in firearms training. There’s a difference between doing and teaching doing.
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  It’s the bullets. They should always be separated from the firearm, except when intended to be fired.
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I think he needed training in firearms training. I looked it up and I have no doubt, in an active situation, he does fine as a reserve officer.https://www.post.ca.gov/reserve-training-requirements.aspx

But, just the other day locally, a neighbor a few miles away was complaining of a bullet that landed in the glass above his french doors. Called the sheriff but didn’t want to press charges, just told them to PLEASE impress upon him responsibility. Why?

It was a kid, about 12 yrs old who shot it. He walked up to the neighbors house himself to face the music.

His dad was showing him how to operate a rifle. But the dad didn’t have the balls to show up. [or was afraid he’d get arrested],

Boo on the dad for shirking responsibility.

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  Florida’s got a strict set of laws about this kind of thing, which probably informed me more than anything. In New Jersey, I don’t think I was as smart about it.

With so many hunters, accidents happen. So an easy fix is to keep the bullets away from the gun.

I forget exactly but I think the bullets and gun have to be kept as far apart as possible when transporting firearms in a car, say, to go hunting. So you’d keep your bullets in the glove compartment and rifle WAY in the back, either trunk or back of the truck out of the cab, and locked.

Seems smart to me.

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