More Early America Genealogy. I was following genetic lines and tripped over a 12th gg-father I didn’t know about. I’m nervous because I don’t want early settlers who were jerks – not that I could help it if they were — but so far they’ve all been alright in my book. Hoping this one is too but I’ll find out. A founder of Concord Mass… hoping it’s not a witch burning kind of guy… a bit nervous here. Rev. Peter Bulkley, son English clergyman Rev. Edward Bulkley, was a dissident preacher who sought religious freedom and helped found Concord, Massachusetts. Peter was born 31 January 1582 at Odell, Bedfordshire, England; he died at Concord, Massachusetts on 9 March 1658/9.

More Early America Genealogy. I was following genetic lines and tripped over a 12th gg-father I didn’t know about. I’m nervous because I don’t want early settlers who were jerks – not that I could help it if they were — but so far they’ve all been alright in my book. Hoping this one is too but I’ll find out. A founder of Concord Mass… hoping it’s not a witch burning kind of guy… a bit nervous here.
 
Rev. Peter Bulkley, son English clergyman Rev. Edward Bulkley, was a dissident preacher who sought religious freedom and helped found Concord, Massachusetts. Peter was born 31 January 1582 at Odell, Bedfordshire, England; he died at Concord, Massachusetts on 9 March 1658/9.
“a stinking carrion and a human invention,”
 
Ah! I got a big free speech advocate – in my genealogy, Rev, Peter Bulkeley, a founder of Concord, Mass, 12th ggfather.
 
What did Peter Bulkeley do?
“In 1643, he was the author and the first signer of a petition sent to Governor John Endecott in favor of Ambrose Martin, who was fined for speaking negatively towards the Puritan church and consequently met significant financial hardship.”
 
So who was Ambrose Martin?
Ambrose Martin: “While living there, he was fined 10 pounds, a large sum for the time, for speaking out against the Puritan church covenant, stating that it was “a stinking carrion and a human invention,”[1] thus being part of one of the first recorded instances of the censure of free speech in colonial America, a freedom that later became a pillar of the United States Constitution.”
—-
 well, i suspect a descendant wrote it, made a “first” sound biggie big, like they do in museums and stuff. But still, it’s pretty cool.
===
  LIke, I never heard of him before tonight. but by the time I’m done researching, I’ll probably think of him as super important to American history. I forget what that’s called, where something is amplified in one’s own mind…
====

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


six × 7 =

Leave a Reply