Moral philosophy::non-cognitive combination of emotivism (express emotions) & prescriptivism (prescribe actions) ⟷ Social psychology::persuasive messages (emotive appeal & directive content).

First a parallel describing what will be said below. Then my prompt. Then the writing.

Moral philosophy::non-cognitive combination of emotivism (express emotions) & prescriptivism (prescribe actions) ⟷ Social psychology::persuasive messages (emotive appeal & directive content).

“Oh this is wonderful! “Persuasive message” captures very well my thinking here.

So, use the framework of moral philosophy.

Using the terminology of moral philosophy and then switch to the terminology of social psychology, being clear when you do so, to make a bridge that goes from more philosophy to social psychology, using persuasion on social psychology side and the non-cognitive combination of emotivism and prescriptivism on the other

In moral philosophy, the non-cognitive combination of emotivism and prescriptivism can be understood as a position that suggests our moral statements express our emotions and simultaneously prescribe certain courses of action. Emotivism focuses on the emotional aspect of our moral judgments, asserting that when we make a moral statement, we express our feelings or attitudes towards a specific situation or action. Prescriptivism, on the other hand, emphasizes that moral statements are not just expressions of emotions but also include a prescriptive element, guiding or directing behavior.”

Now, let’s transition to the terminology of social psychology. In the realm of social psychology, persuasive messages aim to change people’s attitudes or behaviors through communication, often employing a combination of emotional appeal and directive content. In this context, persuasive messages can be seen as analogous to the non-cognitive combination of emotivism and prescriptivism in moral philosophy.

When we analyze persuasive messages from a social psychological perspective, we consider both their emotive and prescriptive components. Emotive elements in persuasive messages, akin to emotivism in moral philosophy, focus on evoking emotions or attitudes in the audience. This can be achieved through the use of emotive language, images, or narratives. On the other hand, the prescriptive aspect of persuasive messages, similar to prescriptivism in moral philosophy, involves a clear call to action or directive, instructing the audience on what they should do or believe.

In summary, the non-cognitive combination of emotivism and prescriptivism in moral philosophy can be bridged with the concept of persuasive messages in social psychology. Both domains emphasize the importance of emotions and directives in influencing human behavior and attitudes, although they apply these ideas in different contexts and use distinct terminology.

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