Mainline Protestant churches tend to be anti-war and pro diplomacy, so they’re more likely to lean towards a two-state solution for Israel + Palestine. The Quakers of course are usually the first to speak up.

Mainline Protestant churches tend to be anti-war and pro diplomacy, so they’re more likely to lean towards a two-state solution for Israel + Palestine.

The Quakers of course are usually the first to speak up.

The original “SJW”s were always churches. Boycotts is a staple of mainline Protestantism, from Martin Luther onwards.

This is especially true in the less / non hierarchical protestant churches who are heavy on doing good things for the planet and less on “just me ‘n Jesus”.

But they draw the line at interfering with politics directly. A boycott is one thing. A stance is one thing. But not interfering with elections or public policy. Secular is secular, religious is religious.

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Just learned “ecumenical” is a better term. That distinguishes them from conservative/fundamentalist Christians who are almost entirely different in every way.

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Well it’s knowing where the lines are drawn. It’s not difficult. They don’t directly support candidates and politicians *shouldn’t* bring their church’s rules into the secular jobs.

Keep your conscience, sure, but don’t expect the secular to turn religious for you.

But that’s something the fundamentalists never learned. They have blurred lines.

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