Logos: It’s a similar concept to Tao. Both concepts arose around the same time: I think in the same generation of humans. One in Greece, the other in China. Interestingly: “In Chinese translations of the New Testament, λόγος (logos) is translated with the Chinese word dao (道) (e.g. John 1:1), indicating that the translators considered the concept of Tao to be somewhat equivalent to logos in Greek philosophy. “

Logos: It’s a similar concept to Tao. Both concepts arose around the same time: I think in the same generation of humans. One in Greece, the other in China.

Interestingly: “In Chinese translations of the New Testament, λόγος (logos) is translated with the Chinese word dao (道) (e.g. John 1:1), indicating that the translators considered the concept of Tao to be somewhat equivalent to logos in Greek philosophy. ”

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“What then is meant by the word “Logos?” Heracletus of Ephesus was the first to utilize this term (which up to this point was a commonly used “word”). He was a Greek philosopher who lived in the late 6th century BC, a contemporary of Lao Tzu, although a continent away. “

http://www.oodegr.com/english/anatolikes/logos_n_tao.htm

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I envision Logos (and Tao) as a kind of engine.
If you’re out of sync with that engine, you’re in for a rough time but if you’re in sync with the engine, you’re centered and can manage the oddness of life better than those out of sync.

So, similar to Rob’s notion.

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