Learning about “Overexcitabilities” — “Too many detailed questions from a student in the middle of a lesson? She’s exhibiting intellectual overexcitability. Give her ten minutes of computer time to get those quesitons answered! A student is deeply involved in a movie or book’s fictional world He’s showing signs of imaginational overexcitability. This kid needs an ongoing, creative outlet for these feelings. Give him an open-ended, creative project as a “what do I when I’m done?” option. Fidgety actions causing annoying noises during worktime? The student might be experiencing psychomotor overexcitabilities. Be sure to offer options for moving around, constructing objects, or otherwise getting that energy out. Sobbing rage over a minor recess trangression Offer a listening, non-judgemental ear and a chance for the student to explain the event. Give some “cool-down” time. Later, discuss ways to deal with strong emotions before they become overwhelming. Overreaction to a sound in the class, agitated behavior over clothing Try to get to the root of the problem, identifying what exactly bothers the student so you can help structure the day to avoid those sounds, sights, or textures. You may also attempt to counsel the student with ways to deal with troublesome sensations. Finally, realize how easily these five traits could overshadow a child’s gifts.” [from https://www.byrdseed.com/five-unexpected-traits-of-gifted-students/ ]

Learning about “Overexcitabilities” — “Too many detailed questions from a student in the middle of a lesson? She’s exhibiting intellectual overexcitability. Give her ten minutes of computer time to get those quesitons answered! A student is deeply involved in a movie or book’s fictional world He’s showing signs of imaginational overexcitability. This kid needs an ongoing, creative outlet for these feelings. Give him an open-ended, creative project as a “what do I when I’m done?” option. Fidgety actions causing annoying noises during worktime? The student might be experiencing psychomotor overexcitabilities. Be sure to offer options for moving around, constructing objects, or otherwise getting that energy out. Sobbing rage over a minor recess trangression Offer a listening, non-judgemental ear and a chance for the student to explain the event. Give some “cool-down” time. Later, discuss ways to deal with strong emotions before they become overwhelming. Overreaction to a sound in the class, agitated behavior over clothing Try to get to the root of the problem, identifying what exactly bothers the student so you can help structure the day to avoid those sounds, sights, or textures. You may also attempt to counsel the student with ways to deal with troublesome sensations. Finally, realize how easily these five traits could overshadow a child’s gifts.” [from https://www.byrdseed.com/five-unexpected-traits-of-gifted-students/ ]

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