Joint Attention issues. Oh, that’s me. When someone’s attention is pointed somewhere, normally people automatically look where they are looking. But it takes me a second more because I have to CONSCIOUSLY CHOOSE. “Frontotemporolimbic connections are important interactive pathways involving the “social brain” via connections between the mFOG, STG, amygdala, and hippocampus. This network lateralization to the right hemisphere at the neonatal stage could be associated with social information processing and emotional regulation in later neurodevelopment. The presently observed rightward asymmetry of betweenness centrality of the STG and hippocampus in term-born controls is consistent with previous findings. Altered lateralization in these regions favoring the left hemisphere rather than the right might contribute substantially to the early onset of social–emotional disorders in preterm infants. Our results suggest that the leftward lateralization of the STG and hippocampus in preterm infants may contribute to the maladaptive development of social communication by altering the network connectivity of the fronto-limbic circuit and thus compromising normative social–emotional processing. This conclusion is partially supported by research on the asymmetry of FA values of the uncinate fasciculus: the largest white matter association tract connecting the prefrontal cortex, superior temporal cortex, and limbic system. Specifically, the right uncinated fasciculus connecting the mFOG, amygdala, and STG at 6 months was found to be a strong predictor of the emergence of joint attention at 9 months of age. The asymmetry of the mFOG and STG is considered to be associated with a rightward shift according to the infant’s maturation pattern, which should be lateralized to the right at term-equivalent ages in neonates. However, we observed an excessive leftward asymmetry that involved redundant leftward lateralization of the mFOG in preterm infants relative to their full-term counterparts; this finding agrees with previous observations on functional MRI of reduced activation in the right mFOG of patients with ASD relative to controls.”

Joint Attention issues. Oh, that’s me.
When someone’s attention is pointed somewhere, normally people automatically look where they are looking. But it takes me a second more because I have to CONSCIOUSLY CHOOSE.
“Frontotemporolimbic connections are important interactive pathways involving the “social brain” via connections between the mFOG, STG, amygdala, and hippocampus. This network lateralization to the right hemisphere at the neonatal stage could be associated with social information processing and emotional regulation in later neurodevelopment. The presently observed rightward asymmetry of betweenness centrality of the STG and hippocampus in term-born controls is consistent with previous findings.
Altered lateralization in these regions favoring the left hemisphere rather than the right might contribute substantially to the early onset of social–emotional disorders in preterm infants.
Our results suggest that the leftward lateralization of the STG and hippocampus in preterm infants may contribute to the maladaptive development of social communication by altering the network connectivity of the fronto-limbic circuit and thus compromising normative social–emotional processing.
This conclusion is partially supported by research on the asymmetry of FA values of the uncinate fasciculus: the largest white matter association tract connecting the prefrontal cortex, superior temporal cortex, and limbic system.
Specifically, the right uncinated fasciculus connecting the mFOG, amygdala, and STG at 6 months was found to be a strong predictor of the emergence of joint attention at 9 months of age.
The asymmetry of the mFOG and STG is considered to be associated with a rightward shift according to the infant’s maturation pattern, which should be lateralized to the right at term-equivalent ages in neonates. However, we observed an excessive leftward asymmetry that involved redundant leftward lateralization of the mFOG in preterm infants relative to their full-term counterparts; this finding agrees with previous observations on functional MRI of reduced activation in the right mFOG of patients with ASD relative to controls.”

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