I’ve got 450+ textbooks in LibraryThing, each of which represent a point in my travelling-as-far-as-I-can-through-topics-via-textbooks thing and, thinking I might have enough data to do some basic analysis, I looked at what LibraryThing recommends for “books I would like”. It recommended a book from 1988, “Sources of Power: How People Make Decisions by Gary Klein”. Ok, never heard of it. I found a copy. So far, finding out that when there’s less than a minute to decide, people don’t decide. They recognize a solution. This model they came up with, they called “recognition-primed decision model” or RPD model. SO far he’s going through firefighter and firechief interviews – they all were like, “of course this is how it works” which was good confirmation for them.

I’ve got 450+ textbooks in LibraryThing, each of which represent a point in my travelling-as-far-as-I-can-through-topics-via-textbooks thing and, thinking I might have enough data to do some basic analysis, I looked at what LibraryThing recommends for “books I would like”.
 
It recommended a book from 1988, “Sources of Power: How People Make Decisions by Gary Klein”. Ok, never heard of it. I found a copy.
 
So far, finding out that when there’s less than a minute to decide, people don’t decide. They recognize a solution. This model they came up with, they called “recognition-primed decision model” or RPD model.
 
SO far he’s going through firefighter and firechief interviews – they all were like, “of course this is how it works” which was good confirmation for them.
” One area of cognition is the study of how people use categories. In our early interviews with firefighters, we tried to see if they would categorize fires in terms of the structure (e.g., single-family residence, apartment, factory). Instead, we formed the impression that they were categorizing fires in terms of what they had to do (e.g., search and rescue, interior attack, exterior attack, prevention of spread to other structures). In other words, the firefighters seemed to be using functional categories rather than structural categories. They were organizing their world on the basis of the response patterns called for. ”
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 Function categories > form categories. Fascinating!
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 I share my notes publicly as I go. So if it’s on Facebook, that’s my notes. I keep a backup copy of my notes on my own site too.I don’t really have goals when researching but sometimes ideas present themselves.

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Ah ha! Thought so. Commanders don’t fall prey to confirmation bias: they’re always double-checking as they go as they don’t want to make wrong decisions.
 
“Commanders often check to see if they might be wrong rather than showing confirmation bias (seeking only information that supports their beliefs). Laboratory studies often find that naive subjects show confirmation bias, but Shanteau (1992) has found that experienced decision makers do not fall prey to confirmation bias. Rather, they search for evidence that would be incompatible with their interpretations.”
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  Unfortunately I’m not good at retention beyond making sure to save them somewhere.

But I’m not reading actual books – these are pdfs. If I’m reading a book that I’m studying, I underline and write in the margins and stuff.

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