It’s only when they are troubling enough to keep you from being able to cope with life’s crap that it’s considered a mental illness.

It’s weird when you think about it: We ALL have it to some degree. I don’t think anybody’s immune. But the levels are different for everybody and the coping skills are different for everybody.

Yet for something that seems to be all too human, we NEVER TALK ABOUT IT.

Why is it so forbidden? But it is. Are we trained young to believe that “voice in the head = crazy therefore can’t talk about it?”

Thing is: That’s thinking. We all have voices in our heads. Everybody. Voices in your head is thinking. It’s normal. Not every thought is “us” yet it’s also “us” as well. Sometimes it comes from a few words someone once said long ago, echoing in the brain. Sometimes it “feels like you”. Sometimes it “feels like it came from somewhere else”.

Normal. Just different levels.

It’s only when they are troubling enough to keep you from being able to cope with life’s crap that it’s considered a mental illness.

But SOMEWHERE along the line (I suspect movies or childhood rumors that never end generation to generation, around the world), we can’t talk about these things.

You see someone you hate: for a split second, you imagine something unthinkable.

You push it away. Hopefully.
Maybe you relish it. Still all in the realm of normal human stuff. I’ve done both.

But we can’t talk about it. _That’s_ the maddening part to me.

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I’d say that using myself as a measure for “normal” is kinda weird, but I have ‘just enough’ psychology learnin’ to know it’s verified scientifically tongue emoticon my own abnormalities also in the realm of normal but maybe I have a broad definition of normal smile emoticon

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