It’s not “thought police” because she took actions. Communicating with someone is action. Thoughts are in your head.

It’s not “thought police” because she took actions. Communicating with someone is action. Thoughts are in your head.

Is the ACLU right in protecting her free speech? Hard to say. In the USA, you can’t yell “Fire!” in a crowed theater. I suspect this falls into a similar bracket. The ACLU may be mistaken in this case.

I’d put this as closer to Charles Manson than to 1984. But being a closed loop (her to him to him killing himself because she ordered him to while he was in a compromised state), the sympathy seems generally limited here. But if she had encouraged him to kill others and he did they’d hold her at a higher level of responsibility.

Sad all around. Sayng KYS is so common among the 8-12 yr old kids these days though that I think we’ll see less of this among 17 yr olds, although we may see an uptick in younger kids killing themselves due to taunting.

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I want to add something but you’ve all covered all of the points i could think of. Fire in a crowded theater, Charles Manson, mixed feelings, the whole thing.

It’s fire in a crowded theater. it’s not thought police because thoughts stay in your head. She had the power in the relationship and I honestly believe “abuse of power” needs to be a thing but unfortunately, unless it’s official power it’s currently not. More like Charles Manson than 1984.

I understand ACLU’s point and they’re right to wave a flag of “caution!” here but not to condemn.

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a) not thought police. Thoughts stay in your head.
b) Charles Manson not 1984 (see a)
c) ACLU was right to wave “free speech caution!” flag but not to condemn the verdict.
d) “abuse of power” here but as it’s not official “boss/employee” “parent/child” power level, it doesn’t legally count yet.

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