It’s like being continually on the top of a pyramid, looking down at the past as it continually moves away from you, yet not a single pyramid but multiple pyramids

Indeed. It gets strangers when you incorporate sound. Somewhere along the line I was trying to figure it out but I think I got side-tracked, but the gist of it is that we’re this cohesiveness we believe we experience is thanks to the lag built into our nervous system. We *must* live in the past, because our senses register things at different times and rates and SOMEHOW have to try to give a sense of synchronicity.

Otherwise, it would be like lightening is with thunder but all of the time. We experience time simultaneously at different rates, depending on what we were processing internally.. except there wouldn’t be processing but direct apprehension.

It’s like being continually on the top of a pyramid, looking down at the past as it continually moves away from you, yet not a single pyramid but multiple pyramids, one for vision, one for sound, one for various bits of our nervous system… and combine that with whatever knowledge we’ve gained about the birth/life/death of things matterial and immaterial… well, our brains just can’t process things like that. Too much uniqueness and not enough pattern for us to handle.

Our experience of reality doesn’t necessarily negate it.. and I don’t think it’s so much that it’s untouchable either… just.. that we touch reality in different ways that we believe we do.

All hail the great lag. A similar technique of controlled lag has entered in the realm of multiplayer games online [and any real-time transactional system online, but especially gaming]. If done right, we get the illusion of simultaneousity.

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