It’s been very interesting, watching words fly by and then trying to comprehend the emotions that are flowing INBETWEEN the subvocalizations,

While my subvocalizing mechanism is very strong (my phonological loop is _always_ processing actively – there’s a chatterbox in there) – when it comes to the initial “urge”, it usually shows up as a picture or or a bodily sense.

For example, if I imagine someone to come here, they’re already here and I can feel their presence, except in reality, they’re not, which expresses itself a moment afterwords as an emotion of irritation. This all happens in milliseconds before the words kick in.

[I’ve been deeply experientially studying exactly this process for a few years, trying to decompose the stages. It’s been very interesting, watching words fly by and then trying to comprehend the emotions that are flowing INBETWEEN the subvocalizations, which happens at approximately 400-800 wpm – at least according to whatever studies they’ve done on the speed of subvocalized thought)

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