It’s a little different. Rather, it’s that there’s a set of words, say, 100,000 in a language with various combinations that are legal but most are not. The lengths of sentences or paragraphs or pages or books can vary but it’s all drawn from that set. As there are a lot of grammatical rules of “how to combine words” and how not to, there is a limit, So, it is not like monkies as it’s not infinite and the combinations have very specific rules.

It’s a little different. Rather, it’s that there’s a set of words, say, 100,000 in a language with various combinations that are legal but most are not.

The lengths of sentences or paragraphs or pages or books can vary but it’s all drawn from that set.

As there are a lot of grammatical rules of “how to combine words” and how not to, there is a limit, So, it is not like monkies as it’s not infinite and the combinations have very specific rules.

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There will have to be. Even if you are describing everything that color isn’t and what’s “left over” is what circumscribes that color’s definition in order to invent a new word to describe it, it can still draw from the current set of words.

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Example:

Plutheria: : a certain color experience that can’t be seen with the current biology of humans. It doesn’t look anything like the primary colors or a mixture of them. We can’t describe what that color will look like using words.

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Following the cookie crumbs, they’re saying that:
a) Jill Stein voters were influenced by Russia and
b) American blacks were influenced by Russia.

I’m sure Russia targeted and that’s a problem.

But I think that did nothing more than fire up debates, not keep people home or change their votes.

However, that ability to even fire up debates to increase an existing rift is a problem.

But saying Jill Stein voters and American black voters caused poor electoral results in 2016 is awful and I think incorrect.

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