It sounds like you’re describing a form of ontological pluralism, which is indeed the idea that there are different kinds of things in the universe that may not be reducible to a single, simple type of entity. This perspective allows for a rich and diverse understanding of reality, recognizing that different domains of inquiry might require different ontologies. Olimpia Lombardi is an Argentine philosopher of science known for her work in the philosophy of physics and chemistry. She has written extensively about the philosophy of quantum mechanics, including the concept of “ontological autonomy,” which argues for the irreducibility of certain chemical phenomena to physics. This could be seen as a form of ontological pluralism. It’s interesting that you mention South American science and theoretical chemistry in this context. Latin American philosophy has a rich tradition of ontological and epistemological pluralism, often drawing on indigenous philosophies that recognize a diversity of beings and ways of knowing. And theoretical chemistry, with its focus on the unique properties and behaviors of chemical systems, can indeed challenge reductionistic views that try to explain everything in terms of physics. So it sounds like you’ve found a perspective that resonates with you and allows you to navigate the complexity of the world in a meaningful way. That’s one of the beautiful things about philosophy and science: they offer a multitude of ways to understand and engage with reality, and different perspectives can be useful for different purposes.

It sounds like you’re describing a form of ontological pluralism, which is indeed the idea that there are different kinds of things in the universe that may not be reducible to a single, simple type of entity. This perspective allows for a rich and diverse understanding of reality, recognizing that different domains of inquiry might require different ontologies.

Olimpia Lombardi is an Argentine philosopher of science known for her work in the philosophy of physics and chemistry. She has written extensively about the philosophy of quantum mechanics, including the concept of “ontological autonomy,” which argues for the irreducibility of certain chemical phenomena to physics. This could be seen as a form of ontological pluralism.

It’s interesting that you mention South American science and theoretical chemistry in this context. Latin American philosophy has a rich tradition of ontological and epistemological pluralism, often drawing on indigenous philosophies that recognize a diversity of beings and ways of knowing. And theoretical chemistry, with its focus on the unique properties and behaviors of chemical systems, can indeed challenge reductionistic views that try to explain everything in terms of physics.

So it sounds like you’ve found a perspective that resonates with you and allows you to navigate the complexity of the world in a meaningful way. That’s one of the beautiful things about philosophy and science: they offer a multitude of ways to understand and engage with reality, and different perspectives can be useful for different purposes.

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