It requires lateral thinking and it’s unfortunate that the English language completely fails us

Trinitarian concepts reach level of great complexity when one gets into the formulations used within the Eastern Orthodox church. I spent a few years in it in my 20s, and compared to what I learned in my Methodist upbringing (which was sparse), _really_ out there and complicated.

They have distinctions between essence and energies, things about the nature of personhood that I’d never seen elsewhere, but then one day, it “clicks’ and you see what they’re talking about.

Mind you, i’m not a believer. Even in the monastery when the system finally “clicked”, I wasn’t a believer.

But it was a puzzle – an intriguing, tantalizing puzzle and I wanted to explore it until it made sense.

I had a similar experience in high school when studying quantum mechanics, the observation/observer effect and how our relationship is between spacetime, the object we are being objective about and how it comes together, one day it just “clicked”.

It requires lateral thinking and it’s unfortunate that the English language completely fails us to provide proper analogy. We have to resort to mathematics to explain it and if we try using words, we sound positive loony because words don’t completely describe well. They weren’t developed to handle it, and relativity is not something that is fundamental to our language or our education system.

I don’t see anything mystical about any of it. I’m not a believer. I’m not New Age. I’m not atheist. I’m agnostic and perhaps there’s even better words to describe me with. But I find systems fascinating.

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