It comes to action. Utilitarianism has the same danger as mysticism even though their approaches are entirely different from one another for when they both lead to action, what makes it a good action or a bad action?

It comes to action. Utilitarianism has the same danger as mysticism even though their approaches are entirely different from one another for when they both lead to action, what makes it a good action or a bad action?
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 I think restricting to survivability is a bit of a high minded idea.
The notion of biological imperative is rather restrictive and neither reflects how empathy is typically utilized by people.
All things are connected is a bit vague.
Human beings tend to consider experience to be a powerful motivator of action. Humans don’t all think of the human race nor of their nation, ethnic group or even family when making ethical decisions.
Rather, there is a great variety in ways that humans make ethical decisions. Your way is one way. There are other ways other people use as well.
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 For example, I lean more towards the Nursing Code of Ethics. I don’t know if it’s my stance entirely but I certainly lean that way strongly over the others.

I did a quick search to find one example and it seems to fit:

There are 4 main principles that are part of the nursing code of ethics. They are,

Autonomy
Beneficence
Justice
Non-maleficence

https://nurse.org/education/nursing-code-of-ethics/
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