Information Redundancy is a part of nature. There’s not just one copy of something but many, rarely identical but similar, often in harmonics. These harmonics are almost holographic in nature, each harmonic containing a significant enough amount of information left from the original so that the original can be reconstructed, at least by creatures like humans whose ears have been trained from before birth to recognize these redundant patterns. In his case, I took a famous song and eliminated all sounds louder than 0 db that were longer than 0.1 sec (1/10th of a second). There’s not much left of the original song. The gaps are there. The shortest, quietest harmonics are left behind. Yet, thanks to our memories we can reconstruct the song. Can someone who has never heard the song reconstruct it? It’s likely, although they won’t have as easy of a time as people who have heard the song before. Still, it should be possible. The redundancies not only _accessorize_ the original information but act as *holders* of the original information. Yet, it’s a partnership. Creatures who do are *not* trained in these sonic rules from birth would probably not have the same ability to reconstruct a song from such minimal information. But you can.

Information Redundancy is a part of nature. There’s not just one copy of something but many, rarely identical but similar, often in harmonics. These harmonics are almost holographic in nature, each harmonic containing a significant enough amount of information left from the original so that the original can be reconstructed, at least by creatures like humans whose ears have been trained from before birth to recognize these redundant patterns.

In his case, I took a famous song and eliminated all sounds louder than 0 db that were longer than 0.1 sec (1/10th of a second).

There’s not much left of the original song. The gaps are there. The shortest, quietest harmonics are left behind.

Yet, thanks to our memories we can reconstruct the song.

Can someone who has never heard the song reconstruct it? It’s likely, although they won’t have as easy of a time as people who have heard the song before. Still, it should be possible.

The redundancies not only _accessorize_ the original information but act as *holders* of the original information.

Yet, it’s a partnership. Creatures who do are *not* trained in these sonic rules from birth would probably not have the same ability to reconstruct a song from such minimal information. But you can.

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