Indeed. You could map it somewhat using a computer in 3D + Time, which is 2 more dimensions to work with, but beyond that, it’s diminishing quality, shadows of shadows of shadows of higher dimensions.

Indeed. You could map it somewhat using a computer in 3D + Time, which is 2 more dimensions to work with, but beyond that, it’s diminishing quality, shadows of shadows of shadows of higher dimensions.

=====

One way to sneak a FEW more dimensions into visualizations is to take advantage of colorspaces, representing each higher dimension by a color, or a particular width of a line, or by a rotation or a zoom.

But while you’ll end up with a pretty thing, how much it actually represents the pattern is iffy.

=====

I think if I had to do it, I’d do it in a first person tunnel with branching tunnels.

You’d see the omega(n) at each dimension but only make a single turn into a higher dimension. In that tunnel, you’d see the next and so on.

This sense of traveling might bring part of the awe to a viewer.

====

Very cool read. I love how he used his system to programmically generate math formulas and proofs just as easily as one another.

====

I would have preferred a NOR gate than a NAND, as NAND is serial and NOR is parallel, but NAND is flatter and easier to represent visually – and they’re both universal circuit makers.

But what a clever use of it!

===

 

I don’t think this is the same as yours, but I think it’s PART of it (prime factor counting, called Omega(n)) – and it might give you some inspiration for jumping off points.
 
https://oeis.org/A001221
—–

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


× seven = 35

Leave a Reply