I’m no good at French but there was: a) enough contextual clues that one could drop out the French words and fill in anticipated English words. (redundancy of information in English) b) Many of the French words are similar enough to English that they even sound similar or are commonly known in English (tres for example). So, I was able to read it. I’d say that this says more about language redundancy One of my all time FAVORITE papers that I’ve ever read is A Mathematical Theory of Communication By C. E. SHANNON, 1948 I read it as a teenager – late 1980s. I had a CB Radio and was newly online and was fascinated by language, linguistics, data compression, radio communication, hacking and stuff. So, that’s the lens from which I see this. Might be wrong but that’s my bias.

I’m no good at French but there was:
a) enough contextual clues that one could drop out the French words and fill in anticipated English words. (redundancy of information in English)

b) Many of the French words are similar enough to English that they even sound similar or are commonly known in English (tres for example).

So, I was able to read it.

I’d say that this says more about language redundancy One of my all time FAVORITE papers that I’ve ever read is

A Mathematical Theory of Communication
By C. E. SHANNON, 1948

I read it as a teenager – late 1980s. I had a CB Radio and was newly online and was fascinated by language, linguistics, data compression, radio communication, hacking and stuff.

So, that’s the lens from which I see this. Might be wrong but that’s my bias.

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As he goes along, you can actually WATCH English unfold from noise to increasing signal, and what’s written is comprehensible LONG before full decoding is completed.

Still blows my mind.

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