I’m aware of at least some of my white privilege and I make use of that to educate other white people about it.

I don’t look for praise. I’m aware of at least some of my white privilege and I make use of that to educate other white people about it. It’s not the job of PoC to do that, just as it isn’t my job to educate mine. But I do it freely because, for me, it matters.

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One of the simplest ways I help introduce other white people (especially those who are antagonistic towards their *flawed* (wrong) understanding of white privilege is this:

I start inserting [white] into their statements where it is missing.

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One of the problems among white people is due to our [white] training:

At a young age, we’re (white ‘we’re’) taught to *not mention* race. This is supposed to solve the problem of race. If you don’t talk about it, it goes away. “People are people after all, and race is just a label”.

Now, this is sometimes true. People are people and race is *sometimes* “just a label”.

But this is the part they (we white people) often miss:

Racial equality hasn’t been reached.

If it has been reached, then nobody would be saying it hasn’t been reached.

Since currently black Americans are saying “Equality between white Americans and black Americans hasn’t been reached” then, guess what, Equality HASN’T been reached. Therefore:

Race is not always “just a label”.

Example: “Looks like a big bad dude”. The words of the helicopter police before Terence Crutcher was shot are burned in my brain.

How the *hell* can a guy in a helicopter 30 feet in the air know by SIGHT that this “looks like a big bad dude”?

I’ll take a guess: His sentence was missing one word that was implied:

“Looks like a big bad [black] dude.”

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