I’ll check. I’ve got archives of most of my stuff from 1989-2021 with some big gaps from that 1999-2002 time period… including a lot of my Excel stuff. But I’m sure there’s a Russian roots text file floating around. I’ll poke around the ancient archives and what old me stuck up there.

I’ll check. I’ve got archives of most of my stuff from 1989-2021 with some big gaps from that 1999-2002 time period… including a lot of my Excel stuff.

But I’m sure there’s a Russian roots text file floating around. I’ll poke around the ancient archives and what old me stuck up there.

=-==

 

Aug 11, 2000: I couldn’t spell further:
——
Thank you for the quick responses!
A quick furthur question:
Are there (either in book form or online)
examples from a real rifmoplet?
Or perhaps some ‘bad poets’ who are
known for their “rifmorplet”-ness?
-Ken
|> Could someone here say what is a “rifmoplet”?
|
|Rifmoplet comes form “rifma” (rhyme) and “plesti” (weave).
|
|It normally stands for a poor poet who writes his “poems” by rhyming
without
|bothering about the content and other attributes like word choice, style,
|alliteration, etc.
===
This particular plan was to improve my learning by memorizing really bad Russian poetry.
  • Like

===

Well heck I *did* offer it. Thu, 6 Jul 2000 Subject: Russian Word Pieces and List of Russian words with English defini tions that are 5 letters or less in length
I have available two Adobe Acrobat 3.0 (.PDF) files.
One contains a large amount of “word pieces” — Roots, Inflections, Prefixes and Suffixes. I gathered the information from various sources over the past year’s time. It does not contain English definitions, however it does give plenty of space to write in a definition, and 6 little boxes for each “word piece” for you to put together your own coding system. (color coding for example).
They are grouped by the first two letters, which I think you will be pleased with.
The file name is PARTS.PDF and it is 823,595 bytes in Adobe Acrobat 3.0 format.
Ask me, and I will send it to you. Feel free to put it on your website or FTP site, as I have neither, but would like this to be made available to others, if it is found to be useful. Consider it public domain.
The other file contains a very large amount of Russian words that are from one to five letters in length, with English definitions. This group, I have compiled from various online sources over the past year, and I have not verified it for accuracy.
This, also, is grouped by the first two letters.
The filename is 5ORLESS.PDF and it is 2,020,822 bytes long in Adobe Acrobat 3.0 format.
Ask me, and I will send it to you. Feel free to put it on your website or FTP site, as I have neither, but would like this to be made available to others, if it is found to be useful. Consider it public domain.
I think you will be pleased.
E-mail: kenneth.udut@[old email] to request it.
I’m hoping this will be useful for somebody out there. It is proving to be useful for me, especially while reading Russian texts. I use the “5 letters-or-less” to look up short words, and the “word pieces” to help break down words into parts.
They are both designed to be printed, and use large letters, as I have bad vision, and do not like to struggle with tiny print.
I will be sending them out in two ‘bulk’ e-mailings, as I am doing this in my spare time at work (which is naughty of me), once later today, and again in a couple of days.

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