“If the PPA represents landmark information, then it must be able to discriminate between 2 places of the same category, but in different locations. Instead, if the PPA represents general category information (as hypothesized here), then it will not represent the location of a particular place, but only the category of the place. As predicted, we found that the PPA represents 2 buildings from the same category, but in different locations, as more similar than 2 buildings from different categories, but in the same location. In contrast, another scene-selective region of cortex, the retrosplenial complex (RSC), showed the exact opposite pattern of results. Such a double dissociation suggests distinct neural systems involved in categorizing and navigating our environment, including the PPA and RSC, respectively.” https://www.pnas.org/content/116/42/21312

“If the PPA represents landmark information, then it must be able to discriminate between 2 places of the same category, but in different locations. Instead, if the PPA represents general category information (as hypothesized here), then it will not represent the location of a particular place, but only the category of the place.
 
As predicted, we found that the PPA represents 2 buildings from the same category, but in different locations, as more similar than 2 buildings from different categories, but in the same location.
 
In contrast, another scene-selective region of cortex, the retrosplenial complex (RSC), showed the exact opposite pattern of results. Such a double dissociation suggests distinct neural systems involved in categorizing and navigating our environment, including the PPA and RSC, respectively.”
 
https://www.pnas.org/content/116/42/21312

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