If I had to do a campaign for a recruitment presence, I’d have a discord and snapchat (I don’t personally because they can be “time sucks” but they would make sense organizationally), and hit some of the purely recreational for in-the-trenches front-line. iFunny could be a good meme distribution site as it’s public and a hub of different beliefs and is often but not always political. It’s run by Russians and has a large often toxic base whose values extend into the dank meme humor of preteens and teens but with the most toxic of it seems to be spearheaded by 20-somethings who were raised on 4chan (but whose overt politicalness seems to be losing sway to the younger dank meme kids who prefer Spongebob and 4-levels of irony-deep memes rather than the old “normie vs dank” stuff of yesteryear… ..but iFunny also has a large set of more liberal and also left leaning who indulge their fandoms and have intersectional potential. Furries and pro-socialist and anarchy segments come to mind at first. You can see active engagements in comments under memes and some fascinating debates happen within them. So it’s not all ethno-state authoritarians on there – the bulk really just want the me mes. Facebook is for grandma is a common sentiment. Making memes that spread though takes a certain mindset and style and I don’t know if that could be done organizationally as branding while common is also more of an amophous thing in that realm.

If I had to do a campaign for a recruitment presence, I’d have a discord and snapchat (I don’t personally because they can be “time sucks” but they would make sense organizationally), and hit some of the purely recreational for in-the-trenches front-line.

iFunny could be a good meme distribution site as it’s public and a hub of different beliefs and is often but not always political. It’s run by Russians and has a large often toxic base whose values extend into the dank meme humor of preteens and teens but with the most toxic of it seems to be spearheaded by 20-somethings who were raised on 4chan (but whose overt politicalness seems to be losing sway to the younger dank meme kids who prefer Spongebob and 4-levels of irony-deep memes rather than the old “normie vs dank” stuff of yesteryear…

..but iFunny also has a large set of more liberal and also left leaning who indulge their fandoms and have intersectional potential. Furries and pro-socialist and anarchy segments come to mind at first. You can see active engagements in comments under memes and some fascinating debates happen within them.

So it’s not all ethno-state authoritarians on there – the bulk really just want the me mes.

Facebook is for grandma is a common sentiment.

Making memes that spread though takes a certain mindset and style and I don’t know if that could be done organizationally as branding while common is also more of an amophous thing in that realm.

iFunny I’d put from 9-40 (I’m 45 but surprisingly other GenXers of the early tech adopters are there), with peaks at 11-14, a slight dip from 15-22, and a lot who seem to be 23-34 going by their comments, profiles and slightly different humor than the 11-14. But these are guesses by me here.

Instagram is more corporate and “pretty” yet not uncommon for high school/college/young adult on up. Some younger on there too.

I zapped Snapchat a few years back as it could see how it could be a timesuck and it was rather toxic at the time, although they did a good job mainstreaming since. I *suspect” you’ll find a lot there though.

Discord is a chatroom and has some decent mod controls although groups can be subject to raids and takeovers. I know it’s popular among middle school and up but I know of a few social groups on FB who also have a discord channel they meet on and the ones that participate seem to be at “hookup culture” age – probably 17-28.

13-23 can be tricky to find together in a diverse environment that’s straightforward. Humor sites with discussions in comment sections seem like best bet but I don’t know how well that would work organizationally but it could work for frontline influencing.

I don’t know the Youtube presence of NYRA but if someone with the time scoured through popular videos that have some talking points relevant to NYRA’s missions, an official account could make comments on them to show that you exist and matter and drive ppl to your Youtube channel which could further drive ppl to wherever else you wish. “Join our discord: [link]” “FB group” etc under NYRA videos.

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ok i subbed. Looks kind of abandoned though. What about a daily NYRA news commentary? [scour daily news for youth rights issues that could tie into mission statements]. It’d be a huge commitment of time/effort but it wouldn’t look so dated.

Yeah. I’ve been on there since mid 2005 (I like checking out new interesting sites) but having a TV program type thing just seemed like an awful lot of work, so I never did. It’s a dump spot for random stuff, and since YT changed to pushing only what’s already popular, new players have a hard time breaking through, unless they play the long-tail SEO game, which is just messy.

How about unofficialNYRA? It could draw a line between NYRA official and disavowable (should it be needed)

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