I’d treat it like other information: Put it out there and step back. Too easy to become another version of, “Know what’s best for…” which reinforces the deeper problem.

I’d treat it like other information: Put it out there and step back. Too easy to become another version of, “Know what’s best for…” which reinforces the deeper problem.

 

I look at it this way: If anything that I’m doing could be construed as gathering people for my ideological army then I have to move carefully. Adults have a lot of invisible power.
 
For example, a lot of what I do is promoting self esteem. I believe in its value. I believe in autonomy too. So, wherever I go, whoever the audience, I do what I can to promote those values that matter to me.
 
But when I see someone is happily in a group with a group identity, I’ll address as individuals with autonomy but I try not to say or do things that tries to break what matters to them, unless I see it’s actually dangerous, which is rare.
 
Let’s say I don’t like Logan Paul for his suicide video or his overall disrespect to Japanese culture.
 
I come across a Maverick who adores whatever Logan Paul does, even afterwards.
 
Unless I they’re making nooses to imitate Logan Paul’s suicide find, it’s not my place to change their group identity.
 
Everybody’s got a road to travel on.
 
It might be a ridiculous example but it’s just these ridiculous situations that adults can find themselves imposing their will too heavily.
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