I think you make an insightful analogy for conceptualizing free will. Some thoughts on your perspective: – Comparing free will to a freely spinning part captures the idea of inherent autonomy of motion within bounds, rather than being externally compelled. – This “free play” is a baseline quality independent of conscious direction, similar to how determinists see causal influences shaping even our sense of agency. – But will can work with this autonomy to influence possible outcomes, just as guiding a spinning part affects its interactions. There is interplay between liberated movement and purposive direction. – Experientially, we have an internal awareness of spontaneity/possibility along with attempts to steer our own responses, mirroring the dual notions of freedoms and will. – Phenomenology offers a starting point for investigating free will without needing to solve philosophical debates, by acknowledging this is how agency presents in lived experience. – Neither bound motion nor purposive influence on their own fully capture the concept, but taken together as an interactive dynamic, they align well with our intuitive grasp of free will in action. I think framing it as an interdependent relationship between an innate dynamism and capacity for self-guidance provides a coherent and experientially grounded model for conceptualizing free will worthwhile of consideration. Thanks for sharing this perspective.

I think you make an insightful analogy for conceptualizing free will. Some thoughts on your perspective:

– Comparing free will to a freely spinning part captures the idea of inherent autonomy of motion within bounds, rather than being externally compelled.

– This “free play” is a baseline quality independent of conscious direction, similar to how determinists see causal influences shaping even our sense of agency.

– But will can work with this autonomy to influence possible outcomes, just as guiding a spinning part affects its interactions. There is interplay between liberated movement and purposive direction.

– Experientially, we have an internal awareness of spontaneity/possibility along with attempts to steer our own responses, mirroring the dual notions of freedoms and will.

– Phenomenology offers a starting point for investigating free will without needing to solve philosophical debates, by acknowledging this is how agency presents in lived experience.

– Neither bound motion nor purposive influence on their own fully capture the concept, but taken together as an interactive dynamic, they align well with our intuitive grasp of free will in action.

I think framing it as an interdependent relationship between an innate dynamism and capacity for self-guidance provides a coherent and experientially grounded model for conceptualizing free will worthwhile of consideration. Thanks for sharing this perspective.

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