I think of qualimetrics as a highly developed metrology. It’s so explicit that they’re easier to follow along with, even though they use a lot more words to describe things in America or Europe might take only a few words.

I think of qualimetrics as a highly developed metrology. It’s so explicit that they’re easier to follow along with, even though they use a lot more words to describe things in America or Europe might take only a few words.
 If your cold feel turns into a warm feel, hydrate. Mostly I was bringing some closure to an unfinished bit, the inkling that there was some “Russian thing” and my surprise at stumbling upon it today from another direction. The guy I got it from, Professor David M Boje is one of those barefoot professors of old trying to tie everything together – in his case, through storytelling (very much in the mythopoetic fashion I think – nice to see again), so it’s part nuts, part genius type of stuff, so I have to be careful not to get too enamored.
Oh they’re not opposed. He’s critiquing our traditional storytelling methods and where the flaws are that need addressing – as you just did.
Traditionally, statistics are presented as in opposition to storyteling and the combination of statistics and storyteling is “empiral science”.
It’s enjoyable seeing it in one place – and I agree with your assessment 100%.
 This is what I’m actually reading right now – the qualimetrics was a side note. Old barefoot hippie professor type, probably did a few drum circles in his day, gonna save the world through a proper ontology of multiplicity with enough vagueness that you have to tie the pieces together yourself in your own way, like any good storyteller will do (leaving openings). As it treads over territories I’m familiar with I’ll probably get irritated while reading but I’m hoping to grab a few bits from it.
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 I liked that they did this production in 1991 – a very sophisticated effort at the time, with supercomputers and all. One of those things that was mindblowing then but within a few years became more commonplace.
I can’t imagine how much $ was spent in making it – and knot theory has progressed a lot in 29 years but this bit expressing the complement of knot theory in the hyperbolic spaces was great.
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I “rate pedagogy” I think. Whenever I see teaching materials I look to see if it’s engaging and interesting — and this fits.
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