I see our received knowledge of the scientific methods to be part of a continuum that was never lost, was never rediscovered, was not reinvented.

the Eastern Christians and the Islamic people traded with each other, both goods and knowledge. Education, schooling, commerce – the cultures were very mixed.

Mind you, I don’t know what PROGRESS there was in Byzantium through those years. As far as I can tell, they were big on technology, at least among the royalty, but certainly many magic tricks were well known and used to impress the religious, such as Holy Fire and such, but not as elaborate as the stuff being pumped out by the early Christian era ‘pagan’ religions. They had some amazing engineering feats. Then again, in Byzantium they had royal chairs shooting up, and lots of shows for the people, likely using the same steam engine-type technologies from Hero’s time.

I see our received knowledge of the scientific methods to be part of a continuum that was never lost, was never rediscovered, was not reinvented.

Rather, it started in early Western Civilization and continued throughout. It seems that during the early part of Byzantium, it was utilized “in-house” much as today a lot of Science takes place within corporations, to support the royalty and the church alike (as well as the mosques and their royalty for their purposes).

But separating out in the first of a ‘modern way’, perhaps Al-Haytham deserves his due, if for no other reason that the educational materials that HE learned from and those he learned from learned from, are gone… and his stuff happens to still be hanging around.

 

If you don’t understand me, I can’t help that.

 

I wasn’t saying you were wrong. Just not completely right.

 

I discuss. I don’t ‘debate’.

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