I only understand some things from Heidegger but one is the idea that the tools become part of us. And when they did brain scans of humans using tools, our mental body shape extends out to include the tools we’re using, whether a hammer or the entirety of the car while we’re using them.

I only understand some things from Heidegger but one is the idea that the tools become part of us.
And when they did brain scans of humans using tools, our mental body shape extends out to include the tools we’re using, whether a hammer or the entirety of the car while we’re using them.
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  • When a piece of equipment isn’t working right, we often negotiate with it, “Oh Come on you, just cooperate already!” — I hope the author addresses that stuff.
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  • I routinely and unashamedly say “thank you” to objects for cooperating with something I want to do for example.
  • “There are a significant number of similarities in the accounts I will describe in this work, which imply a cohesion in the behaviors of people who experience the belief in object sentience and connect them into a group made up of those who engage in solo folklore.”Solo folklore! Oh that’s wonderful.
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  • ‘“material companions” are the most relevant to this study. These are everyday objects of little obvious value which accompany people throughout their lives; they “are not ‘saved’; they are allowed to grow old and, however humble, they accumulate meaning and value by sheer dint of their constancy in a life” (1989:330).
    These are the objects with which people form relationships much in the same way they form relationships with other human beings, and they are often the kind of objects described by those who experience the belief in object sentience.
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  • As a child, I believed that one of my dolls was plotting my death. I believed that unchosen items in the grocery store felt sad and unloved, and that my possessions felt rejected when I threw them out or gave them away. I talk to my car, apologize to items I drop, and believe my shoes are happier when I polish them. My research has connected me to dozens of others who feel the same way, and has led me to believe that our beliefs are neither trivial, nor inherently problematic. Instead, they have the potential to create a more positive experience of the world we live in. While there have been times in my life where the belief made day-to-day activities difficult (discarding objects was a nightmare during my teenage years), there have also been times where it enabled me to feel more connected to my environment. I have both pathologized and romanticized the experience at different stages of my life. Stating this, I am aware of my own subjective bias when approaching the topic, but still feel capable of presenting a fair and intriguing picture of the others with whom I share the experience.
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