I like this list. I paraphrased it best I could: Values: Affective: How much it makes you feel good. How much it makes you feel bad. [I like it] Utility: How much it benefits you. Affective+Utility are common together. [Useful] Resource: Good to have. Valuable. (is this meta?) Quality: Comparing items/activities of the same type/kind. [consumer reports] Prowess: How much better/worse a person performs. [competition] Normative: How well do you conform to this norm or that norm? [standards] Personal normative: How good or wicked is a person? [morality] Esteem: How prestigous or respected is a person? [class]

I like this list. I paraphrased it best I could:
Values:
Affective: How much it makes you feel good. How much it makes you feel bad. [I like it]
Utility: How much it benefits you. Affective+Utility are common together. [Useful]
Resource: Good to have. Valuable. (is this meta?)
Quality: Comparing items/activities of the same type/kind. [consumer reports]
Prowess: How much better/worse a person performs. [competition]
Normative: How well do you conform to this norm or that norm? [standards]
Personal normative: How good or wicked is a person? [morality]
Esteem: How prestigous or respected is a person? [class]
So:
LIKE:
USEFUL:
GOOD:
QUALITY OF PRODUCT:
COMPETITION LEVEL:
STANDARDS
MORALITY
CLASS.
===

a) I like this author’s list of values.
b) It is useful because I understood it immediately whereas normally I would not.
c) I think it is broadly applicable.
d) I haven’t compared this to other values typologies.
e) I understood the author whereas many I would not so he gets a high score.
f) don’t know.
g) don’t know
h) don’t know as an author of a textbook, likely prestige
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