I just go, ‘yeah, it’s possible” ’cause it’s his journey.

One of my friend’s kids went from a Brony stage, a short Illuminati stage and has currently been on an Ancient Astronauts phase. He’s like 13 now I think, maybe 14.. I occasionally get messages on G+ from him about some new discovery he made. I just go, ‘yeah, it’s possible” ’cause it’s his journey.

 

Implied in my “yeah, it’s possible” is, “But is it likely?” but that’s something he’ll see if he decides to. Who knows, he could be a lifelong alien hunter and that’s cool too.

 

Oh absolutely. It’s a segue. Heck, I *still* believe “it’s possible” that we’re the seed of ancient astronauts that visited us.. or that Moses’ Transfiguration upon seeing the Face of God was acquiring some kind of radiation thing from alien visitors that JUST might have extended his life long enough where he could see the Promised Land but not enter it, however many years later.

All fine possibilities by me. Like multiverse, which I also don’t believe in, but it’s good food for the imagination.

 

Oh absolutely. It’s a segue. Heck, I *still* believe “it’s possible” that we’re the seed of ancient astronauts that visited us.. or that Moses’ Transfiguration upon seeing the Face of God was acquiring some kind of radiation thing from alien visitors that JUST might have extended his life long enough where he could see the Promised Land but not enter it, however many years later.

All fine possibilities by me. Like multiverse, which I also don’t believe in, but it’s good food for the imagination.

I keep an open mind about it all though because of one simple fact: I wasn’t there. smile emoticon

 

“first five books of Genesis” in particular is FULL of _so much symbolism_. People have been teasing it apart for thousands of years now. Wonderful stuff and many good life lessons to be learned from it.

 

I tried to memorize the book names as a kid: Let’s see if I can remember:

Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1st Samuel, 2nd Samuel, 1st Kings, 2nd Kings… and… yeah, that’s when I’d get bored.

 

The only time I ever read through it cover-to-cover washttp://www.amazon.com/Readers-Digest-Bible-Condensed-Testaments/dp/0895771063 – I never understood the fascination with chapter-verse ’cause they didn’t make a big deal of it when I was growing up.

That verse that you mention though, yeah – I was always fascinated by that as well. The “Who is the us?” thing.

Later on, during my stint in the Orthodox Church, I got to see some marvelous iconography and much more detailed explanations of the ROLE of the Cherubim and _why_ they had six wings. Really cool stuff.

 

 

Wow… jeez, been so long. Good test for memory here.
The “like us” part you mentioned is one.

Oh, i liked one of the Psalms. let’s see: Ah – Psalm 69 (70 in Greek Septuagint) “Water’s up to my neck” – and of course Psalm 23.

Hm. new testament-wise, not sure. Of course revelations was fun stuff – nothing like a good Apocalyptic story, especially when it’s the Apocalypse, although neither the Methodist I grew up in nor the Orthodox ever made a “thing” of it, so I only ever saw it as symbolic.

There was some resurrection stuff I liked. Oh! I like the Isaiah “Wheels within Wheels” thing – likely thanks to Erich von Danikin’s Ancient Astronaut references….

and I liked the story of David and his shitty bros… and Job got me through a few crappy times in life. The rainbow scene in the Noah story. Hm, that’s what comes to mind.

And yes, I agree smile emoticon I love mythology because a good story can inspire people tremendously.

 

Ah yes the Romans one – that’s related to http://orthodoxwiki.org/Nous – the Noetic prayer concept. Also… oh what is the fancy word they used for it… it’s not transfiguration… but same idea of a whole body/mind/everything transformation.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nous for a more general overview of it.

 

A friend who is a wife of an Orthodox priest – she’s in her 60s I think – we’ve been online friends since 1994 on and off… she posted this the other day: http://preachersinstitute.com/2015/11/10/christians-without-noetic-prayer/
 
and it’s related to that Romans verse as well. Romanides got a lot of criticism because he wanted to bring back the monastic inner prayer stuff to the congregations as a whole and move them away from being “hey look, it’s people of my same culture” groups. He did a good job of it too as he was involved in priest training for a number of years, which, hen they spread out to different parishes, brought that stuff with them. Good stuff.

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