I initially believed the literature about “the adolescent brain” a few years back but since I’ve found some alternatives. This one I found just now counters the lack-of-control notion and interprets it as seeking experience for preparation for the adult world. In short, it’s by and large quite rational and conscious. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/08/170816122345.htm

I initially believed the literature about “the adolescent brain” a few years back but since I’ve found some alternatives. This one I found just now counters the lack-of-control notion and interprets it as seeking experience for preparation for the adult world. In short, it’s by and large quite rational and conscious.
 
 
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/08/170816122345.htm
  What then of cultures where children go to work earlier, maturing faster? Or in a study which I was looking for but found that instead, in the Phillipines I think or Thailand (I’ll find that study), they DON’T have a risk-taking adolescent period but instead see a spike around late 20s/ early 30s. Is it necessarily tied to prefrontal cortex development?Is the development driven by unstoppable genetics or by environmental/cultural factors?
  I thought I had to quick figure out who I was as a teenager. Very annoying tbh. I didn’t realize that I never had to “figure it all out” ’til later. I believed a lot of the BS. “Do what you love and the money will follow” type stuff. Being an adult is easier.
Oh I wasn’t criticizing you Zee. It’s just a topic that comes up now and again – even with some calls to raise the age majority to 23 or 25, especially after a particular rape case in the USA, which would have absolved the rapist of responsibility. So perhaps my response was a bit strong.Here’s a POV from cultural neuroscience. I just started reading it but it looks good.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2894667/
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  It seems an interesting hypothesis. It’s the first I’ve heard of it. I don’t do well under certain pressures, diagnosed with “Generalized Anxiety” when I was 11. Learned biofeedback, guided meditation – this was back in the early 1980s. It helped, although to this day certain pressures cause me to be unable to think: My threshhold hasn’t changed but rather I can recognize the “ramping up towards” as it happens within me and divert within a certain window of opportunity. If I miss that window, my ears get hot, tunnel vision, and I don’t really know what I’m saying until long afterwards.I can’t say it was worse as a teenager to now. It wasn’t worse. But it was worse as a kid before I learned some coping skills.So, as someone for whom training has helped, I lean strongly towards plasticity.
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  “natural course of adolescence” is an assumption in the above that I disagree with. People who go through common schools in a common culture are likely to have common experiences but I wouldn’t call that natural but cultural.
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 I’d like to see studies done comparing, let’s say, common schooling vs democratic schooling or unschooling programs. Or common schooling against cultures which have yet to establish a colonial standardized education program.
  I’d much rather discover that the methods used in compulsory education are to blame but compulsory education is an invisible backdrop in these studies, for they tend to treat adolescents as coming from outer space into the lab and hand wave environment as “peer pressure” rather than going after the environment all of those peers are collectively going through.But that would require systemic changes.
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 Adults take tests differently. They are long out of school. They don’t get school PTSD reactions to testing. But in schooling, tests and quizes are given an abusive (imo) weight of importance. Test after test, quiz after quiz… and now these guys in labcoats don’t hardly take into account this fact when doing the studies.
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  Still though: culture or genes? Of course its a bit of both but there’s a lot of studies yet to be done cross culturally.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27853430

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  I’m discovering that cultural neuroscience might just be my next field of exploration. I didn’t know it existed until 1/2 hr ago.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26441506
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