I have a few friends in the process of getting either their Master’s or PhD’s in theoretical physics

I have a few friends in the process of getting either their Master’s or PhD’s in theoretical physics right now. Two are women right here on FB I’m friends with. It’s a tricky field if you want to work in it directly job-wise, but you can command nearly double the salary of someone with an MBA if you have a PhD in Theoretical Physics ’cause damn, it looks good to have someone like that working for you.

 

[I was gonna do it in college – Theoretical Physics – back in 1990 – but the guy who gave the prospective-students talk called “Quantum Mechanics For Millions” that so inspired me was on sabbatical that year, so I chose child psychology instead. Didn’t finish but in any case no regrets either ’cause I suspect I would’ve ended up working somewhere on string theory… which wouldn’t have been all that bad, but there was a glut of people working in string theory at the time I would’ve graduated at the right level.

 

Yeah, I think that’s why they keep it. I mean, there’s no NEED for the mathematical language to be so obtuse – it’s just tradition. Helping my 10 yr old nephew through common core math today; compound fractions simplification. What kills him – which killed me back in my time – is the whole “show your work” part. He can stare at it and get the answers right but showing your work the way THEY want to see it is what kills him. I spent more time listening him rant about the unfairness and ridiculousness of “show your work”, repetition, and scheduling equal amounts of homework on ‘off days’ than him actually doing it. He was right, which is why I listened.

 

Yeah, at this point if I had the resources to go back to school, Neuroscience would definitely be hot on my list, particularly Cognitive Psychology. It has the best mix of ‘story explanation’ and measurable stuff to help people understand what’s going on up there.

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