I don’t know who they are but the skin on the guy on the right looks thin and blue-ish, almost ice-y. Bags under the eyes and what appears to be possible botox on the forehead. I’d need to see his neck to get a better idea how old he is, but I smell a *little* work being done there.

I don’t know who they are but the skin on the guy on the right looks thin and blue-ish, almost ice-y. Bags under the eyes and what appears to be possible botox on the forehead. I’d need to see his neck to get a better idea how old he is, but I smell a *little* work being done there.

“In most cases, the increasing age is not really a cause for concern. The majority of these older dads don’t have fertility problems, and father babies without serious physical or developmental problems, says Robert E. Brannigan, M.D., a urologist and specialist in male reproductive medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine.”

Then goes on to some exceptions. But considering that “in most cases” means – in most cases – seems that the majority of the time, age of the father doesn’t make much difference in the offspring. Older mothers run risks though as their eggs have time limits.

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Well I don’t think you’re wrong. But with articles like that it’s easy to get caught up in the exceptions rather than the rules. Makes sense: Its boring to hear “Go ahead and have a baby if you want, give it a shot!” rather than “Did you know there’s a 1% greater chance your child will be born with a tail now that your older?”

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You’re right. The age of the dad doesn’t make much different in the quality of the children. Maybe he’ll get crankier if you take his bifocals and call you “grandpa” when he’s out with his friends at the mall but really, not much difference.

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[wow just check out that horrible shift in pronouns and ‘you’ perspective I did there. eesh.]

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