However, there are a number of methods for Hermeneutics and honestly, a fixation on particular wording choices is a very limiting method for Scholarship.

Alas, the one that I had used growing up was the RSV – Revised Standard Version. I’ve seen the revision of that, and during Biblical studying times, looked at other versions; I even have a Russian Bible that I was using to help teach myself Russian with. [it actually helped a little; an easy source of comparing concepts across languages while increasing vocabulary, as everything’s split up Chapter/Verse. [and it’s an ‘authentic’ Russian Bible, not a retranslation from the English from one of those evangelical bible companies.

However, there are a number of methods for Hermeneutics and honestly, a fixation on particular wording choices is a very limiting method for Scholarship.

I always thought the concept of “the text speaks for itself” to be a ridiculous trend, very modern (just the past few hundred years or so). Older methods such as considering the context within which the author was writing, and trying to understand things from their point of view given their life story, is a MUCH more ancient technique than literalism.

We may call it socio-cultural and modern, but it’s quite ancient http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catechetical_School_of_Alexandria started it all – at the latest 190 AD, but likely earlier.

Claims of ties to St Mark of course might be spurious, might not be, but the tradition continues in modern literary analysis techniques with books other than the collection of Biblical texts canonized a few hundred years *after* the founding of the Theological school at Alexandria.

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