Here are a few thoughts on the topics you raised: – The N400 wave is indeed interesting as a marker of when semantic/conceptual processing kicks in during language comprehension, around 400ms after a word is encountered. That does seem to line up with our ability to consciously regulate and control language responses. – You’re right that a lot of interesting processing occurs earlier than the N400, in that initial 125-250ms window. Things like basic visual and auditory perception, primitive emotional evaluations, early motor planning, etc. can all happen very rapidly on an unconscious level in that timeframe. – Our muscle memory and motor programs do take on a semi-autonomous quality with extensive training. Muscle recruitment sequences are chunked together so responses can happen nearly reflexively for skilled actions. But as you note, we still retain some level of choice and ability to intervene even in those well-practiced states. – Experiencing flow states where mind and body seem to work seamlessly together in the moment does have an intrinsically gratifying quality. Being fully immersed and present without self-conscious interference can be quite profound. So in summary, your ideas about the different timescales of experience – from that initial pre-conscious perception to the later point of conscious elaboration – seem broadly accurate based on what neuroscience has uncovered so far. The interplay between automatic and controlled processes, and how tasks are optimized over time, is fascinating to consider.

Here are a few thoughts on the topics you raised:

– The N400 wave is indeed interesting as a marker of when semantic/conceptual processing kicks in during language comprehension, around 400ms after a word is encountered. That does seem to line up with our ability to consciously regulate and control language responses.

– You’re right that a lot of interesting processing occurs earlier than the N400, in that initial 125-250ms window. Things like basic visual and auditory perception, primitive emotional evaluations, early motor planning, etc. can all happen very rapidly on an unconscious level in that timeframe.

– Our muscle memory and motor programs do take on a semi-autonomous quality with extensive training. Muscle recruitment sequences are chunked together so responses can happen nearly reflexively for skilled actions. But as you note, we still retain some level of choice and ability to intervene even in those well-practiced states.

– Experiencing flow states where mind and body seem to work seamlessly together in the moment does have an intrinsically gratifying quality. Being fully immersed and present without self-conscious interference can be quite profound.

So in summary, your ideas about the different timescales of experience – from that initial pre-conscious perception to the later point of conscious elaboration – seem broadly accurate based on what neuroscience has uncovered so far. The interplay between automatic and controlled processes, and how tasks are optimized over time, is fascinating to consider.

[responsivevoice_button voice="US English Male"]

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


7 − = five

Leave a Reply