He won’t make much of an impact if he wins. Checks and Balances

He won’t make much of an impact if he wins. Checks and Balances. So, sure, he can be President if he likes. After 4 or 8 years, it’ll be another President who accomplishes little whose few campaign promises they manage to squeeze through Congress will be overturned by the next one. Gotta love Checks and Balances.

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Of course. But then, there will be the next President who will change much of it. Heck even Clinton, who only gives the show of being a continuation of Obama, will likely decimate Obamacare to help “secure her legacy” and win some public trust. It’s what they all do.

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Which President successfully fulfilled their campaign promises just as they promised? I’m sure there’s plenty of foundation to support my assertion that the answer would be none, somewhere in the realm of “they sorta did kinda ok not really”

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The problem is and I say this for your benefit and those who are also true believers:

There is a very high probability that many who are supporting him vocally online will stay home and watch his inevitable victory, thereby causing his defeat.

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I prefer to vote 3rd party if possible. People who are democrat or republican always tell me I threw away my vote. But they’re wrong: it was my vote. Not theirs. There’s no throwing a vote away if you use it the way your conscience dictates.

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I don’t know the planet this election is happening on for you, but the hatred for Clinton among progressives is far greater than any hate coming out of the Trump side for her.

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I don’t know where you’ve been looking. Trump will want Sanders’ people. He’ll say whatever it takes to get them on board. He’ll piss off a lot of alt.right but not enough for them to get discouraged, just a little disappointed.

He has a far greater shot at grabbing at least a portion of Progressive vote than Clinton does. He’s already started by his position on transgenders in bathrooms. You’ll see more of that.

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You’ll be embracing Progressives in a few months. He’ll grab a number of Sanders’ supporters, the ones that don’t go to Gary Johnson or go the “let’s be realistic” route for Clinton. The hatred for Clinton among Sanders’ supporters is quite nearly bloody.

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She’s unpopular but at the same time, the media has been relentlessly in support of her. There will be plenty of people at the polls going, “Fuck.. I guess I gotta go Clinton…. ugh” and check the box.

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Indeed. I mean, I think the Sanders and Trump fables of “he’ll win against all odds.. .against The System and be triumphant” must be encouraging to each of the parties: and honestly, I hope they continue believing it. I want to see the 2 party system crack a little and extreme posiitons like Sanders and Trump are the only way to achieve some real change in the future parties.

But.. that being said, of those that will actually go out and vote instead of staying home either in assumed victory or assumed defeat, many will just go with what they feel is a “regretful necessity”, which would be Clinton. They’re not showing up on the polls… they’re not enthusaistic supporters. But they do vote like good citizens.

Many of the people vocal at this point in the process aren’t regular voters and are likely to stay home that day.

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Not much is gonna change either way. Checks and Balances works very very well…. except for War of course. But internal policy changes are purposely slow. It’s the way our govt is set up to operate. This is all campaign promise stuff: empty words to gather votes.

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If you REALLY want him to win, you’d better make sure people will go out and vote for him. I believe in the political system, as broken as it is, and people should choose what their conscience says.

But all of this confidence among the common people can easily backfire for your cause. I’m not impressed by confidence or youtube videos or statistics. The only day that matters is the day people go out and vote.

More people would rather stay home online and talk about it than actually going out to vote. That won’t change.

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I went to a very liberal hippie school in 1990/91. Had all the safe spaces and stuff and it the town where university PC was born two years prior. [it actually came from the US military].

I watched it change through the decades. There was a shift in the late 1990s and a polarization started happening, ending up in what you see today.

They’re more likely to be Sanders supporters or Libertarians (now that the choice is available) than Clinton supporters, who is typically most popular among older 2.0 feminist white women and black women and other minorities.

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I just know how the system works.

a) War is not covered under checks and balances.

b) economic situation is not within the power of the President.

Let’s swap it – maybe I can fix your idealism a little:

Let’s say Sanders wins. Do you really think the country will become Socialist?

Of course it wouldn’t. Stuff has to pass through Congress. Large, established departments with power will have to comply and not push back with their own agendas.

It wouldn’t happen.

Now, let’s make it Trump.

Same.

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If this is your first election cycle that you’re participating in, maybe you’re not aware of these things. But the political system does not hinge on a single person. It was designed to be slow and inefficient. Slow and inefficient creates jobs, jobs security. The slower things happen the more stable the government.

Forefathers designed it that way. That’s why we haven’t been destroyed by a campaign promise made in 200+ years.

That won’t change this time either. Same thing as always happens will happen.

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Well, I wasn’t being ageist here. But the US political system is a complicated thing. This part of the election process is just empty words they say in order to gather votes. By the time they get into office, whoever it is, they can’t enact any of their promises without a huge amount of pushback from Congress and large established departments. So, outside of war, not much changes for any President without a struggle on their part.

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True, although this being a topsy-turvy election cycle – first one I’ve seen that’s been this exciting yet (I find politics BORING AS HELL): – third parties *may* stand a chance, depending who they are.

Just today, my own mother, whose antipathy towards politics is greater than my own, asked me about Gary Johnson. She’s been posting about him on Facebook.

Says something to me about the potential for third parties in this election cycle. But, I voted for H-Ross Perot twice… I keep shooting for a 3rd party to make a wedge. Doesn’t have to win, just make a wider and wider wedge.

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This is the first election (I’m 44) I’ve seen that:

a) Has TWO extremists with very active supporters
b) No clear Republican
c) No clear Democrat.

Hillary Clinton is being Centrist. A little Democrat, a little Republican. I’ve never seen anything like this before. This election, there’s NO REPUBLICAN. It’s mindblowing to me.

I’m not saying we’d get a Libertarian president but I wouldn’t be surprised if he pulls some good numbers, even this late in the game.

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I think the Democratic party will become a Centrist party, encompassing standard Republican and standard Democratic alike.

Trump is wrecking the Republican party. It’s been an interesting cycle so far. I look forward to changed parties.

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Problem is: globalism is on her side, which means all the big businesses and such. Sanders and Trump’s failure was to be too Protectionist. It doesn’t court capitalism well.

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Individualists like you and me who would go for a Sanders or a Trump or a Gary what’s-his-face and vote on forum polls on Facebook aren’t big corporations who trade with other countries and depend on a globalist USA to prosper.

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Of course. In perfect theory that’s all true. But Sanders’ and Trump’ protectionist stance, while popular with the people aren’t supportive of global trade.

Sanders wants Organic Farms. Trump wants white people picking tomatoes down the street here instead of the illegals we got. Works out to the same thing.

Personally? I’d be ok with it. But then my laptop would cost $4000 instead of $400 and my Walmart and Dollar Stores would be gone. That kinda sucks. Unfortunately, on election day, I have a suspicion that realization will cross people’s minds as they go and vote, despite what they’re saying now.

At the same time, I’m really grateful for this election cycle because it FORCES protectionism to be something that the next president needs to at least partially incorporate into policy. So, that’s defintely something there.

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I’ll likely vote 3rd party. I usually do anyway. Once I voted for Bush – only time I voted Republican for President. [I missed a couple of elections but usually I find the Independent]. It was his 2nd term. I liked his cabinet.

Colin Powell and shit – I was like “fuck, well, we’re IN this stupid mess now, at least he’s got smart people around his dumb ass to help him out”.

So, what does he do a month later? Fires them all. FUCK. Last time I do that. My voting experiment was a fail.

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The radical left has owned academia since the early 1970s. It’s not changing anytime soon. They don’t have the power to change free speech: just on campuses. Radical left doesn’t usually get into positions of political power. They just write letters and say things. True influence level is small. Always has been.

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What HAS been interesting though, is that the alt.right has fully learned to adopt the left-language and use it for its own purposes.

That’s proof positive that politically correctness actually succeeded because all political sides are completely fluent in it.

Now, they have to deal with the consequences of it.

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am too ’cause *just in case*. I gotta vote with my conscience. Neither Trump nor Hillary are fits for my conscience, even though I’m not worried whoever becomes president ’cause they all get their wings clipped.

I’m glad a libertarian with a decent track record is in now. I _might_ actually go that route. Haven’t decided yet. As always, I wait until the primaries process is over with.

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I’m not a fan either, but I’m playing “wait and see”… see if he gains momentum. I don’t shut off my choices until I close the curtain behind me on election day. Who knows? I may end up voting Trump even. Right now, I’m just gathering knowledge.

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Ah – PC. Ok, here we go:
Back in 1990, I learned about PC. It was about basic civility, calling people what they liked. It was meant to be respectful. The US military came up with it in the 70s/80s and some girls at a nearby college wrote a pamphlet encouraging its usage.

We had safe spaces too: floors and areas set aside for people to congregate free of threat. Nobody minded. It was their thing, so go for it.

At the time, the Right was clueless to any of this. Spoke an entirely different language. Politically correct was meaningless gibberish to them.

Flash forward 25 years. PC became militant with third wave feminism, and as a reactionary backlast, the alt.right popped up seemingly out of nowhere over the past 15 years and is fluent in what became “University-speak”, except flipping it around to support their positions.

Now we’re in 2016. Both the SJW and alt.right are speaking exactly the same language, just taking different sides. This is novel and fascinating to me.

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Indeed. That’s a big one. They’re the “Face of the USA”, even if they can’t directly affect foreign policy (except for war.. that they can do directly in principle, although in practice, it goes through Congress and the cabinet and such).

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Indeed. That’s the beauty of our forefathers. They gave us a sluggish system so that it would be stable and no temporary head can do too much wrong… or anybody for that matter. It’s kept the USA stable for 200+ years and will continue to.

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I can go with that as well. We definitely need to pull back and circle the wagons and lick our wounds for a little while before trying to conquer the planet again.

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Perhaps eventually, but for the first few years, it’ll weaken the dollar tremendously: what buying power will it have if we’re not spending it?

They’ve got plenty of other markets. We need China more than China needs us.

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It goes beyond products. Even back in 2000, I worked for a pharmaceutical company as a systems analyst.

All of our coding was done by Brazalian programmers. They were cheap, well educated and very very good at their jobs.

Saved the company tons of money.

We won’t get those jobs back here with product tariffs.

 

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I wonder if any of them have plans for service jobs?
Loss of American jobs goes beyond manufacturing: Service jobs have been exported and I don’t see any way to bring telecommunications and programming jobs to the USA. Corporations will go with cheapest options and I honestly don’t think there’s a way to force corporations to NOT use their cheaper services.

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He’ll backpedal by the summertime to gather a bunch of Sanders’ people. He won’t apologize but he’ll just change his mind.

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Well, part of me thinks it’s a clever wise game: but I think he’s short-sighted. He sees today’s needs but not tomorrow’s.

He’s learning as he goes. He’s great at shouting down competition but I don’t think he can see where he words will lead a month from now or a year from now.

So, I don’t think he has a long-term strategy, just a series of short term strategies gears for the moment.

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He would’ve been. There’s no doubt it was the plan in the works on both sides. But, there’s more than two sides now, which makes this a fascinating race. One of the sides is dead – the Republican side is a dead side right now. Blows my mind.

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Join the Internet. Stuck here typing away is annoying. Just suck me in and I’ll live there. Might as well get it over with.

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