Habit + goal directed systems act concurrently and compete with one another in the brain? “hippocampal-dependent, allocentric, reference frame to a striatum-dependent, egocentric” However, it is likely that in the intact animal, there is a dynamic interdependency between goal-directed and habitual systems and that control is likely to emerge simultaneously and competitively (Wassum et al., 2009). If habit and goal-directed processes indeed act concurrently, then this invites questions regarding what precisely are the factors that influence the integration and competition between the two systems. We return to these issues below. It is also worth noting here that although goal-directed or response-outcome learning has a strong declarative flavor, it is conceptually distinct from a hippocampal-dependent stimulus-stimulus form of learning. There are some alluring parallels with this account of the evolution from goal-directed to habitual responding. One is the transfer of control of a simple spatial behavior (turning in a “plus” maze) from a hippocampal-dependent, allocentric, reference frame to a striatum-dependent, egocentric one (Packard and McGaugh, 1996). Similar double dissociations arise from reversible lesions in these two regions at different time points, for example early or late, during learning. The other parallel is with the transfer over the course of experience from allocentric to egocentric reference frames of a sequence of manual button presses (Hikosaka et al., 1999), although this was proposed to depend on two separate cortical regions that both interact with the basal ganglia.

Habit + goal directed systems act concurrently and compete with one another in the brain?
“hippocampal-dependent, allocentric, reference frame to a
striatum-dependent, egocentric”
 
However, it is likely that in the intact animal, there is a dynamic interdependency between goal-directed and habitual systems and that control is likely to emerge simultaneously and competitively (Wassum et al., 2009). If habit and goal-directed processes indeed act concurrently, then this invites questions regarding what precisely are the factors that influence the integration and competition between the two systems. We return to these issues below. It is also worth noting here that although goal-directed or response-outcome learning has a strong declarative flavor, it is conceptually distinct from a hippocampal-dependent stimulus-stimulus form of learning.
 
There are some alluring parallels with this account of the evolution from goal-directed to habitual responding. One is the transfer of control of a simple spatial behavior (turning in a “plus” maze) from a hippocampal-dependent, allocentric, reference frame to a striatum-dependent, egocentric one (Packard and McGaugh, 1996). Similar double dissociations arise from reversible lesions in these two regions at different time points, for example early or late, during learning. The other parallel is with the transfer over the course of experience from allocentric to egocentric reference frames of a sequence of manual button presses (Hikosaka et al., 1999), although this was proposed to depend on two separate cortical regions that both interact with the basal ganglia.

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