Familiarity vs Novelty: 20ms apart but quite distinct. -Ken —- This study reports the onset of behavioural responses to familiarity at 390 ms, coherent with previous studies (360–390 ms: Barragan-Jason et al., 2013; Besson et al., 2012). It also identifies for the first time the onset of behavioural responses to novelty at 410 ms. If we subtract 110 ms for a decision/motor response to occur (Kalaska & Crammond, 1992; VanRullen & Thorpe, 2001), this minimal RT fits with the temporal dynamics of novelty shown in electrophysiological studies. Event-related potentials associated with novelty indeed peak between 200 and 350 ms (anterior N2) and between 200 and 300 ms for the novelty P3a (Courchesne, Hillyard, & Galambos, 1975; Daffner et al., 2000; Friedman, Cycowicz, & Gaeta, 2001). Moreover, the current results show familiarity to be more efficient than novelty, yielding higher levels of accuracy. Familiarity was also shown to rely on a more conservative strategy and minimal RTs were shorter than for novelty. Emma Delhaye, Christine Bastin, Christopher J.A. Moulin, Gabriel Besson & Emmanuel J. Barbeau (2017): Bridging novelty and familiarity-based recognition memory: A matter of timing, Visual Cognition, DOI: 10.1080/13506285.2017.1362090

Familiarity vs Novelty: 20ms apart but quite distinct. -Ken
—-
This study reports the onset of behavioural responses to familiarity at 390 ms, coherent with previous studies (360–390 ms: Barragan-Jason et al., 2013; Besson et al., 2012).
 
It also identifies for the first time the onset of behavioural responses to novelty at 410 ms. If we subtract 110 ms for a decision/motor response to occur (Kalaska & Crammond, 1992; VanRullen & Thorpe, 2001), this minimal RT fits with the temporal dynamics of novelty shown in electrophysiological studies. Event-related potentials associated with novelty indeed peak between 200 and 350 ms (anterior N2) and between 200 and 300 ms for the novelty P3a (Courchesne, Hillyard, & Galambos, 1975; Daffner et al., 2000; Friedman, Cycowicz, & Gaeta, 2001).
 
Moreover, the current results show familiarity to be more efficient than novelty, yielding higher levels of accuracy. Familiarity was also shown to rely on a more conservative strategy and minimal RTs were shorter than for novelty.
 
Emma Delhaye, Christine Bastin, Christopher J.A. Moulin, Gabriel Besson & Emmanuel J. Barbeau (2017): Bridging novelty and familiarity-based recognition memory: A matter of timing, Visual Cognition, DOI: 10.1080/13506285.2017.1362090

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