Etymology of “of”? From PIE “apo-“. I had to think about this one, as “of” can also be synonymous with “between” (like inside, possession, from, part-to-whole relationship) — but then thought in terms of generations, how successive generations are “of” the prior generation — and “away from” / “apart from” clicks in. apo- before vowels ap-, word-forming element meaning “of, from, away from; separate, apart from, free from,” from Greek apo “from, away from; after; in descent from,” in compounds, “asunder, off; finishing, completing; back again,” of time, “after,” of origin, “sprung from, descended from; because of,” from PIE root *apo- “off, away” (source also of Sanskrit apa “away from,” Avestan apa “away from,” Latin ab “away from, from,” Gothic af, Old English of “away from,” Modern English of, off).

Etymology of “of”? From PIE “apo-“. I had to think about this one, as “of” can also be synonymous with “between” (like inside, possession, from, part-to-whole relationship) — but then thought in terms of generations, how successive generations are “of” the prior generation — and “away from” / “apart from” clicks in.
 
apo-
before vowels ap-, word-forming element meaning “of, from, away from; separate, apart from, free from,” from Greek apo “from, away from; after; in descent from,” in compounds, “asunder, off; finishing, completing; back again,” of time, “after,” of origin, “sprung from, descended from; because of,” from PIE root *apo- “off, away” (source also of Sanskrit apa “away from,” Avestan apa “away from,” Latin ab “away from, from,” Gothic af, Old English of “away from,” Modern English of, off).

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