Despite a lot of the negative comments I’ve seen so far, I don’t think she’s stupid, but I do think that perhaps she’s lived in an “echo chamber” where the same notions have been bounced around and to her, are perfectly reasonable, rational, logical and sound. I don’t think she sees herself as racist. In her environment, with other people saying the same things, echoed on the radio and TV shows and in the people she knows and talks to, everything she said seems to be the kind of thing that ANYBODY* would agree with. The interviewer however has a different perspective. His facial expressions are telling. My perspective happens to be more in line with the interviewer’s perspective. * ANYBODY : Anybody has a special, limited definition here. Implied in “anybody”, from what’s likely her perspective, is white people. She never has to say “white people”. From her perspective, it’s assumed that “everybody” = “white people”. She looks at him not with eyes that are fighting, but eyes that seek mutual understanding. “You know what I’m talking about, right?” I’m not angry at her or at those who hold these beliefs. But, they don’t stand for me and mine. She didn’t see racism growing up because she didn’t have to deal with it. She never had to deal with it, in her life. In her business. In her political work. Racism, for her, didn’t exist until Obama was elected President. Then, for her, racism began. No, I don’t think she’s stupid. But sheltered? Very. Had I grown up in a different part of the USA with different teachers, different radio and TV shows, different news sources, different leaders (religious and political), I could be her and I wouldn’t know any difference. But, I’m not. This doesn’t make me better or her worse. But if I was giving the interview, I don’t know if I could restrict myself to making pained, incredulous faces.

Despite a lot of the negative comments I’ve seen so far, I don’t think she’s stupid, but I do think that perhaps she’s lived in an “echo chamber” where the same notions have been bounced around and to her, are perfectly reasonable, rational, logical and sound.

I don’t think she sees herself as racist. In her environment, with other people saying the same things, echoed on the radio and TV shows and in the people she knows and talks to, everything she said seems to be the kind of thing that ANYBODY* would agree with.

The interviewer however has a different perspective. His facial expressions are telling. My perspective happens to be more in line with the interviewer’s perspective.

* ANYBODY : Anybody has a special, limited definition here. Implied in “anybody”, from what’s likely her perspective, is white people.

She never has to say “white people”. From her perspective, it’s assumed that “everybody” = “white people”. She looks at him not with eyes that are fighting, but eyes that seek mutual understanding. “You know what I’m talking about, right?”

I’m not angry at her or at those who hold these beliefs. But, they don’t stand for me and mine. She didn’t see racism growing up because she didn’t have to deal with it. She never had to deal with it, in her life. In her business. In her political work. Racism, for her, didn’t exist until Obama was elected President. Then, for her, racism began.

No, I don’t think she’s stupid. But sheltered? Very. Had I grown up in a different part of the USA with different teachers, different radio and TV shows, different news sources, different leaders (religious and political), I could be her and I wouldn’t know any difference.

But, I’m not. This doesn’t make me better or her worse. But if I was giving the interview, I don’t know if I could restrict myself to making pained, incredulous faces.

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