Christopher George Buckner in the 1980s and 1990s, black rap artists and producers did not have the same established music networks that were available to established commercial genres they formed their own networks that were separate from the music industry because they had to there’s a very big difference between having access to an existing network versus absolute scratch it can be as simple as an aunt or uncle, college friends, classmates from school, etc. if they have their own networks, those can join and help as well in some way some people whose networking includes Ivy League schools for example gives access to all of their own networks of their friends families

it’s not just good parents:

they used their own built networks to help
in the 1980s and 1990s, black rap artists and producers did not have the same established music networks that were available to established commercial genres

they formed their own networks that were separate from the music industry because they had to

there’s a very big difference between having access to an existing network versus absolute scratch

it can be as simple as an aunt or uncle, college friends, classmates from school, etc.

if they have their own networks, those can join and help as well in some way

some people whose networking includes Ivy League schools for example gives access to all of their own networks of their friends families

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