But when large amounts of animals live in close proximity to each other, it doesn’t take much for an outbreak among the population.

Precaution is best. I don’t know the situation where you are with rabies. I know that we’ve never encountered any rabid animals in 12 years of business, including a number of bat exclusions; there _was_ a raccoon that acted strangely but it was a hot day and it was a thirsty critter that was back to normal after some water.

But that being said – every part of the country is different and it’s possible that rabies is more of a problem where you are. Precaution is always best.

You made the right decision. Peace of mind is #1.

Oh wow. Yeah, we’ve been lucky here. I mean there’s animal trappers here that use fear-for-marketing purposes (we don’t ’cause here it’s not true) – but I suppose everything being so far spaced out here, including the animal population, there’s a much smaller likelihood of massive outbreaks of disease.

But when large amounts of animals live in close proximity to each other, it doesn’t take much for an outbreak among the population.

We had that with bees. Killer bees that first came up were a real problem: I went with my brother on a call once and those things were smashing themselves against the truck to get at us. Scary stuff.

But since then they mixed with the local population and now the domestic bees are just a *little* more aggressive but the killer bees seem to be nowhere in sight – just modified regular bees now.

But disease is a much different story. I’m glad you took care of it.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


+ two = 11

Leave a Reply