But when I take into account how I have a place to live, how I’m eating, and put THAT all together,

 

I run a business. For tax purposes, I hardly have any either. My usable income is extremely small – I put all of it back in the business and since my employees are also in the same house, the income from the business helps pay the bills.

So, technically, I’m poverty. But when I take into account how I have a place to live, how I’m eating, and put THAT all together, I can’t complain about my status that much.

It’s historical accident/happenstance of parentage that I happen to be here in the USA.
I could easily have been in Syria.
If I was in Syria, it’s likely that life wouldn’t have been that bad for the most part. Syria was a fine place to live, even away from the urban areas and things would have been fine until 5-6 years ago.

Then it’s likely I’d be having to pack up whatever I had and leave and hope for the charity of foreigners in strange lands just to survive.

I could also be in China, born in the farmlands and villages and be working on communal property for the local fireworks maker or electronics manufacturer.

 

I’ve never known poverty from a world point of view. I’m not saying you haven’t or aren’t, just pointing out my perspective.

 

Well, there’s ownership of then there’s usage of.

Example: We’re talking right now. How’s this?

Even if it doesn’t seem to go directly into a bank account with your name on it, thanks to the somewhat socialist economies of the West, we can benefit simply by being here and I think that counts.

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