But as analogies are accessible, skill transference can be taught, as long as it’s not _too_ heavy handed or too frequent so it ruins the fun.

The key I think – and I wish this would be required teaching for teachers, professors and students alike:

Incorporate transferable skills from a young age.

I knew people who were into D&D as teenagers. Wasn’t my thing: I could see how it grabbed my friends and sucked them in, and I was more interested in writing music on my little Tandy Color Computer, or learning BASIC or binary logic at the time…

..and yet, I appreciated the creative thinking processes involved.

[I knew *I’d* get sucked in which is why I avoided the 4-8 hr Doritos and Mountain Dew sessions]

Somewhere in my late teens, I learned about Transferable Skills. “What color is your parachute?” Read that. Changed my way of seeing things.

So, I thought, “Oh, being able to keep track of mana will transfer into them being great money managers!

Well, they didn’t. The skills remained within the D&D realm from what I could see but they didn’t automatically transfer over.

Such to me is the danger of segmented thinking. Keeping fields separated (“This is fiction. This is fact”) is useful for many things and yet, there are concepts that can be transferred form one to another via analogies.

I’m lucky in that lateral thinking comes naturally to me. It’s almost a curse but it’s a 99% blessing.

But as analogies are accessible, skill transference can be taught, as long as it’s not _too_ heavy handed or too frequent so it ruins the fun.

lol here I go pretending to be an educational psychologist again. I gotta stop that.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


+ six = 10

Leave a Reply