Being “Present” while “Aware of one’s presence” outside of a crisis moment can be difficult.A different mechanism is involved or seems so.

Being “Present” while “Aware of one’s presence” outside of a crisis moment can be difficult.A different mechanism is involved or seems so.
 
For me, my mind thinks in music. So it’ll play ‘something’ in one part, then another part quickly joins. But that part likes to dance with the first part in numerous ways,and they have a musical conversation. And more parts can be added doing the same kinds of dancing with and against each other.
 
When I get caught up in it, watching and participating in the musical changings, I’m amazed at how many things one can do against the same musical backdrop. A cop-out thing to say is that “there is infinite possibilities” and while true in the absolute, it bypasses all of the combinations that have instant aesthetic appeal and I think they can probably be ranked in various ways if one wanted.
 
So while this is going on in my head, I’m both present and also aware that I am there choosing what I’m playing in my head as it goes on, modifying parts as it goes. It’s a delicate thing as any distraction from the outside world or a stray wrong thought can cause it to tumble. But it’s nice while it’s going on.
 
Combinatorics,
Ranked by validity (apparent (common aesthetic or maybe gestalt?), acceptable forms of contrast ? Missing the right music theory words here but it only cares about rhythm and melody interplay of parts, not other aspects such as timbre etc. Is it just juxtaposition? interpolation? I dunno

 PHRASING. It’s phrasing. Has to be it. I think that’s it. Is that all it is? It goes with improvising which is what my mind’s up to. So, would it be improvisational phrasing and form? ::: checks notes ::: wait… so this is what it is? No, have to narrow it down more.
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Well, damn that’s it. No wonder I couldn’t narrow it down all this time.
 
https://garciamusic.com/educator/articles/improve.improv.html
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Not sure why it’s always jazz though. That’s not the style but I guess that’s the genre in which this stuff is explored and other genres borrow-from it? Must be.
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 I mean, I don’t know what lies beneath but there’s something there. There’s layers working at different tempos, evolutionary scale is very slow, moment to moment problem solving is immediate and fast, and there’s inbetween and they all communicate with each other.And that’s just within one person. Within a species, there’s other forms of communication that influence the levels as we’re an active part of things.Going deeper, there all of life itself, and there’s wordless communication between species, all the way down to bacteria up to us, or wherever.So what’s beneath that? I don’t know. But the hum is always there.
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Feels like I’m going backwards as I research. Getting closer but further. Not looking for Bach’s mathematics or standard jazz sound. I saw something on movie music scoring which was close …
 
I know when I hit the right terms I’ll find what I’m looking for. I guess I’m going to go with math-and-music again, see what comes up.
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http://www.samueljpost.com/the-music-post/there-are-more-syncopated-variations-a-mathematical-music-theoretical-exploration-of-rhythm-part-1
 
“The answer is: 191 syncopated, 29 un-syncopated. That’s a lot more syncopated than not!”
 
Is that what I was looking for? Rhythmic variations? That’s a drumming thing? Ok, I think that’s what I was seeking?
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Ah yes, getting closer still:
 
“The Oxford Handbook of Music Psychology” : “universals in music processing” (Chapter 2),
“Processes for Moving Together in Time”
 
” For example, the Western concept of meter—featuring a particular hierarchy of strong and weak beats—is different in important ways to the West African concept of the beat (Magill and Pressing, 1997), and is different in important ways to the concept of the “tal” in North Indian (Hindustani) music (Clayton, 1997; Iyer, 1998). The result of these different conceptions is that listeners in differ – ent cultures perceive the temporal structures in different ways; when musically untrained North Indian listeners listen to music, they infer tal whereas musically untrained Western listeners infer meter.”
 
[…]
 
“The perception of temporal structures is likely to be the result of temporal entrainment pro – cesses. Temporal entrainment occurs where two rhythmic processes interact with each other, eventually locking in to, or transiently moving in and out of, a common phase and/or periodic- ity. Such processes play a role in speech production (Goldstein, Byrd and Saltzman, 2006) and joint action (e.g., Knöblich and Jordan, 2003), suggesting that entrainment is a domain-general mechanism. These entrainment processes are likely universal in music perception and produc – tion (e.g., Clayton, Sager and Will, 2005; Drake and Bertrand, 2001; Fraisse, 1982; see also Jones, Chapter 9, volume), and complex behaviors like chorusing and turn-taking may be based in these processes (Phillips-Silver and Keller, 2012). Large and Jones (1999) argue that entrainment occurs when neural oscillators entrain to external events such as meters or rhythms. Because this entrainment process may underpin temporal perception, periodic events (i.e., repeating rhythms, meter) facilitate the efficient allocation of limited attentional resources, and make synchronization activity (e.g., tapping along or musical activity) more accurate.”
 
[…]
 
“Importantly, such synchronization is not always based on periodic meters. Nonperiodic meters are common cross-culturally. “Free rhythms” such as the Indian alap, Turkish taksim, or Baroque harpsichord fantasia, are improvised and unmetered, while music with accel- erating rhythms is found in Japanese Gagaku music and Tibetan monastic music (Huron, 2006). The aksak meters (e.g., 3+2+2) of Bulgarian dances (Moelants, 2006) and African rhythms are not based on simple periodic meters. Therefore, any posited universal entrain – ment process must also be able to account for those elements of nonperiodic temporal struc- ture that are predictable; for example, a listener might entrain to the median period length (Barnes and Jones, 2000).”
 
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Expectancy, attention, and time
R Barnes, MR Jones – Cognitive psychology, 2000
 
I think this might be “the thing” I was looking for? I want to solve this dilemma (knowing what my focal point is that I’ve been dancing around for way too long). It involves knowing the field, the language (ontology)
 
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0010028500907382
IS this it?
 
A PDF is available at: https://www.academia.edu/download/47022360/Expectancy_Attention_and_Time20160705-5653-1er311d.pdf
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 “Attentional capture exemplifies this sort of low-level attentional control because it typically involves an immediate reaction to a salient or sudden and unexpected stimulus change that grabs attention (Egeth & Yantis, 1997; Yantis & Jonides, 1984; Remington, Johnston, & Yantis, 1992; Theeuwes, Kramer, Hahn, & Irwin, 1998 ).”
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